John Mayo

M, b. 26 December 1810
FatherJoseph Mayo b. 21 Mar 1771, d. 21 Oct 1820
MotherJane Poythress b. 1775, d. 20 Mar 1937
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     John died. He married Mary Louisa Campbell. John was born on 26 December 1810. He married Sarah Susan Tennent on 10 March 1836.

Family 2

Sarah Susan Tennent d. 7 Dec 1843
Child

Elizabeth Pleasants Mayo

F, b. 20 November 1812
FatherJoseph Mayo b. 21 Mar 1771, d. 21 Oct 1820
MotherJane Poythress b. 1775, d. 20 Mar 1937
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Elizabeth died. She married Charles James Stovin. Elizabeth was born on 20 November 1812.

Sarah Susan Tennent

F, d. 7 December 1843
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Sarah was born. She married John Mayo on 10 March 1836. Sarah died on 7 December 1843 at Cedar Grove, Richmond County, Virginia.

Family

John Mayo b. 26 Dec 1810
Child

John Bland Mayo

M, b. November 1840
FatherJohn Mayo b. 26 Dec 1810
MotherSarah Susan Tennent d. 7 Dec 1843
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     John died. John was born in November 1840.

Beverly Tucker Crump

M, b. 10 June 1854, d. 30 March 1930
FatherWilliam Wood Crump b. 25 Nov 1819, d. 27 Feb 1897
MotherMary Susan Tabb b. 9 Nov 1824, d. 7 Apr 1891
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Beverly's occupation: Judge.. Beverly was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 10 June 1854. He married Henrietta Ogle Tayloe on 13 October 1884. Beverly died on 30 March 1930 at age 75.

Family

Henrietta Ogle Tayloe b. 25 Jul 1861, d. 30 Aug 1949

Emmeline Allmond Crump

F, b. 26 December 1849, d. 31 October 1937
FatherWilliam Wood Crump b. 25 Nov 1819, d. 27 Feb 1897
MotherMary Susan Tabb b. 9 Nov 1824, d. 7 Apr 1891
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     She was baptized at 'Waverly', Gloucester County, Virginia. Religion:.1,2 THE EVACUATION OF RICHMOND

      [This account of the evacuation of Richmond and the entrance of Federal troops into the City was written by Mrs. William B. Lightfoot for her children. Mrs. Lightfoot is a daughter of the late Judge W. W. Crump, whose home was on the corner of Broad and Twelfth Streets, overlooking the Capitol grounds. -- R. A. L., Jr.]

      A conversation between my father and mother in our home a few weeks before the 1st of April, 1865, gave me the first feeling of anxiety which I remember and was a warning of the storm which was to break over our heads in the evacuation of Richmond on the 3rd of April. He was on the eve of starting on a mission to Georgia for the Government in his capacity as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, and being thoroughly acquainted with all the interests of our poor languishing cause foresaw with more clear vision than many others the impossibility of holding Richmond longer. He hesitated not, however, at the call of duty to leave his family and property, but took every precaution for the welfare which his unusual prudence and affection could dictate. I do not remember the exact day of his departure, but sad was the parting and heavy the heart he carried with him on leaving us without his protecting care on which we had always so entirely depended.

      My mine next reverts to St. Paul's Episcopal Church on Ninth and Grace Streets on Sunday, April 2nd, at the morning service where all was quiet and peace, and Holy Communion to be administered, when Mr. Irving, our dignified sexton, always well dressed and self-sufficient, came to President Davis, sitting in his pew and whispered to him. The President left immediately, but the service proceeded to the end, when our beloved pastor, Dr. Minnigerode, dismissed us with the blessing. My mother went home with us children directly from church and in the afternoon Mr. Trenholm, the Secretary of the Treasury, was announced; the same little library in which the former conversation took place was the scene of the interview which was short but full of intense interest. He came to say that the President and Cabinet would start at once for some point farther south, Danville, Va, he thought; the few troops that were here would also leave as the enemy was advancing and would, he supposed enter the city some time on Monday or probably Tuesday. That was the first intimation we had of the import of the message the President had received in church. It was then early in the afternoon and I had been accustomed to teaching in the Sunday School of an Episcopal church for colored people somewhere beyond Leigh Street. D. C. W. Jones was superintendent and Rev. D. Sprigg, who edited the Southern Churchman, took much interest in it. I started as usual, considering it to be my duty and by no means realizing what a state of excitement was prevailing on the streets. I had not gone far before I met friends who sent me home, as there would be no scholars or school that day, and then began to have many fears and foreboadings not knowing what would happen; many tales of bad treatment of the inhabitants had come to us from Norfolk. In the meantime my mother had been advised to remove our silver, my father's private papers, etc., to the house of his sister on Seventh Street, that not being as liable to be occupied by the incoming enemy as was ours, which was near the Capitol and Governor's house. One precaution had been taken by my father which stood us in good stead now; he had sent for an old colored man who had lived with him for many years as his body servant before his marriage, and a mutual attachment had existed ever since; he was a free man, and father felt he could trust him implicitly, so told him if we were in any trouble to come to our assistance. We sent for him that day and gave him many valuables to care for at his house; my sister, two little brothers and myself then carried what we could of silver, etc., to our aunt's house as we were advised to do. My mother made some strong belts and put into them as much gold coin as we could conveniently carry and we wore them under our clothing. Father had left a small amount with her as, of course, our Confederate money would be of no use if Richmond was evacuated. At night fall of that Sunday everything was quiet in our home, and though most anxious fears must have filled the dear mother's heart, I know she put her trust in God and committed all to Him, and we young people slept the sleep of youth and inexperience. I do not remember being waked up at all, but found myself the next morning standing in the middle of the room just as the sun was rising, having been rousted to instant action by the explosion of bomb shells and other ammunition in the Arsenal. The fearful sound continued for hours, and the fire then kindled spread rapidly over the lower part of the town, burning tobacco factories, grocery and jewelry stores, and coming as far up town as to the court house in the Capitol Square just opposite our home. All this has been often told, my part is with the scenes inside the house. The household was soon aroused by the sounds which were louder than any cannon I ever heard and we all assembled in the dining room. We soon learned the cause of the frequent explosions, and did not imagine then that the fire would come as far up town, and my and I had some hats which had been left at a store to be pressed into a newer shape, having been worn the previous year; so we were about to start out to get them, for come what may "in the Spring a young girl's fancy turns" to hats, even if they are a year old, and we who had long been accustomed to hard times, had no idea of giving them up. It was then about 8 A. M. and we did not think the Yankees would come in before afternoon or probably the next day. Just then my aunt who lived a few squares off came in; I shall never forget her face as she told of the excitement on the streets and that the Yankees were expected every minute, that she had stolen off to run down and tell us good-bye, not knowing if we should ever meet again, and that her father-in-law, with whom she lived while her husband was in the army, would never have allowed her to come unprotected through the streets if he had known of it. Of course, we gave up our expedition, and thought no more of hats that day. After a short visit she took a tearful leave of us, and truly sorrow filled our hearts. Our household consisted of my mother, two brothers, Edward and Beverley, about 10 and 13 years of age, respectively, my sister Fanny, 15 years, a dear cousin, Kate Tabb, of Mathews County, who lived with us and went to school, and myself, 17, my old mammy who had nursed my mother and all of her children, the dining room servant (so called then, now butler), the cook, who had been my father's mammy, the washer woman who had several children, and my mammy's granddaughter who assisted in nursing and cleaning, and was also a good seamstress. We could see the fire from the front of our house raging on Main Street, and the smoke was so dense the sun looked as if in eclipse; numbers of people were coming by laden with spoils from the burning stores. Our two boys could not be found and several of us stood at the gate questioning everyone about them. No one had seen them and moments seemed hours as the fire became worse and the smoke more oppressive. We dared not go out to look for them, which indeed would have proven a hopeless task in the crowd of men, women and children who were rushing around to get what they could. In about half an hour we saw them coming up the street and literally pulled them in and thankful to have them safe. They were self-possessed as possible and told of the scenes they witnessed on Main Street. While we were standing at the gate a cavalryman dashed by, went into the Square and I at once realized the fact that I had seen my first real Yankee, actually the van of the army which soon came in all the "pomp and circumstances" of victors up Governor Street. I can never forget the man's appearance, and the thrill of horror that went through me; his blue jacket with the yellow stripes down the back is vivid in my mind's eye today. He rode int the Square and in a few moments the Virginia and Confederate flags were down and the Stars and Stripes were floating over the Capitol. We went into the house, locked all the doors, shut the front shutters and felt as if we were in a state of siege; just then there was a hurried pull at the bell and on opening the door we saw a lovely young lady, Miss Cary, who had run from the Governor's house, a guest there, or rather had been spending the night; she scarcely knew what to do when she got into the street and found the crowd too great for her to venture home, so took refuge with us; she remained most of the day until someone came for her and though we had only known her slightly, our common distress made us feel well acquainted. We spent most of the day at the front windows looking through the shutters engrossed in the scenes passing in the streets as regiment after regiment passed up Governor and Broad Streets; the negroes were in a wild state of excitement, many women rushing up to the soldiers calling them their Saviour.

      All day long the fire raged, till finally the old Court House in the Square caught and we watched it burn with increasing anxiety. Our house caught fire several times on the roof, but with the aid of an old gentleman neighbor and the servants, was controlled and did little damage. It added, however, to the strain of anxiety and excitement we endured that memorable day. We tied all the clothes and valuables we could in blankets and sheets, ready to move if necessary. The authorities did all they could to extinguish the fire, but not only much property, but many valuable papers were destroyed. I have often wished that I had picked up some of them that lay for days afterwards on the pavements, blown everywhere by the wind and partially burned, some record of importance might have been secured. One company of soldiers stopped just at our gate and had all sorts of things they had rescued from the fire on their way through it. I remember seeing a barrel of sugar, hams, dry goods, shoes, etc. Many of the negroes would beg from them and generally received something.

      Uncle Simon, our butler, was on very good terms with them and would steal up and pull a ham or a pair of shoes through the railings while they were not looking. We young people, in spite of our grief, were amused at many things which occurred but our dear mother bore the responsibility of us all without the support and advice of her devoted husband to whom she had always looked with the utmost confidence. When the night came it was cool and we had a wood fire in the large grate in our beautiful dining room, had to burn candles as the fire had practically destroyed the gas works. At every sound we would start and listen and when the bell rang mother would open the door with a lighted candle in her hand and all us watching behind her, trembling with fear. We were not interfered with, however, and it was generally conceded that our enemies behaved with consideration under the circumstances. Our faithful Peter, the free colored man, took good care of us and was the cause of a good joke we had on our dear mother. During that day when we were in much fear that house would be taken possession of (being very large and in so convenient position), Peter came in and said to mother in a most comforting manner: "Don't you be scared, Miss May, I done tell 'em you is a good union woman!" The indignation this excited was intense, we girls could scarcely be restrained from hanging a Confederate flag out of the window, to remove such a shameful blot from our house and name. Poor, innocent Peter had no idea of the result of his little fabrication. We gradually grew more accustomed to the sight of the blue coats on the streets and after many days of seclusion determined to venture out for a walk, but only thickly veiled, as we felt we were going almost into a strange place. My friend who was with me dropped her handkerchief just as a stylish looking young officer was passing, who promptly stooped and picked it up; as he handed it to her, he turned his head away and held his hat before his face, while she very ungraciously received it and we walked stiffly away, as if guilty of an act of impropriety. As the days passed by, the fate of our dear father was of course uppermost in our minds, for the country being in such an unsettled condition south of us, we had no tidings of him for weeks. Nothing mad a deeper impression upon my mind than the visits of General Lee to our house at that time. After his surrender at Appomattox, he came into Richmond riding on "Traveler" followed by all the men he met on the way, in perfect silence; when he reached his home on Franklin Street he turned, lifted his hat and disappeared into the house. But, ah, how tenderly we all honoured him and he knew he was forever enshrined in the heart of every man, woman and child in the Southland. His appearance on the streets during the short time he mad his residence among us was a matter of such curious interest to the many strangers in our midst, they would often follow him, that he did not go out except in the early morning and at night. Several times just at twilight we had a visit from him accompanied by one of his daughters, usually Mildred, and he would tell us if he had received any tidings of father, for which we were most grateful. We were very anxious to have one of the buttons, from the uniform he had worn in the war, and he promised to bring them himself. He did so; one for my sister, my cousin and myself, putting them into my hand with a gallant little speech, as if I were bestowing the favor instead of receiving what I considered one of the greatest of my life; also asking us to pay for them by giving him a kiss, which was willingly conceded, certainly in my case, with a thrill of reverence and emotion which his presence always inspired. Before leaving for his permanent abode in Lexington, Va., as President of the Washington & Lee College, I carried to him a photograph of himself with the request for his autograph; he was sitting in the back parlor very busy, had received many visitors for the same purpose and spoken many sad farewells, but welcomed me with as much gracious courtesy as if I had been the only one, wrote my name as well as his own on the picture. I met him again at the White Sulphur Springs where he and Mrs. Lee had a cottage near ours. Also once at the Old Sweet near the White Sulphur; a great many of his old soldiers came from the surrounding country to shake his hand; it was a touching sight to see him in the parlor there in the midst of those rough mountaineers as kind and courteous as to the ladies who were interested spectators on the occasion.

      The Reconstruction period from which we suffered as District No. 1 had been told by others, and after my father's return our lives were spent in comparative quietness; after all fear of his being arrested was over, he resumed the practice of his profession. The returning soldiers of our army from prison and many hardships endured after the surrender, were heroes in our eyes and indeed in the estimation of the world. I think there cannot be found a better hero than a Confederate soldier!







      Sometime in 1927 a notice was given by the Governor of Virginia that a ceremony would be held at the Capitol in response to a letter from Mr. Frederick Asherton Stevens, the grandson of the Union officer who took down the Virginia flag, stating that he wished to return it to the Governor. His grandfather had taken it home with him and kept it in a glass case.

      The hall of the old House of Delegates was full of interested spectators; the Confederate veterans of R. E. Lee Camp in full uniform were grouped together. Appropriate speeches were made by the Governor and others, to which Mr. Stevens replied in a modest and charming manner. Mrs. Charles Talbott (nee Mumford) who as a girl had mad the flag and presented it to the Confederate government and Mrs. Lightfoot were presented as noted personages.

      When the ceremony was over, the whole company went into the Capitol Square and saw the tattered old flag raised to its former place on top of the Capitol building amid cheers. The flag remained in place only a few hours and was then placed in a glass case, where it is carefully preserved.

      Upon his return to Massachusetts Mr. Stevens wrote to Mrs. Lightfoot as follows:

      "My dear Mrs. Lightfoot:

      I want you to know how delighted I was to have the honor of meeting you.

      I have always been a great admirer of the traditions of the southern people and it pleased me particularly to meet on who witnessed both the lowering and re-raising of that historic emblem."

      Source: Virginia Historical Magazine, Year Ending December 31, 1933, Vol. XLI, pages 215-222, by the Virginia Historical Society. Emmeline was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 26 December 1849.2 She married William Bernard Lightfoot at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 17 October 1871.2 Emmeline died on 31 October 1937 at age 87.2

Family

William Bernard Lightfoot b. 16 Mar 1845, d. 16 Jan 1929
Children

Citations

  1. [S109] Baptised by Rev. Charles Mann.
  2. [S1020] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 40.

Fanny Booth Crump

F, b. 29 December 1849, d. 10 March 1937
FatherWilliam Wood Crump b. 25 Nov 1819, d. 27 Feb 1897
MotherMary Susan Tabb b. 9 Nov 1824, d. 7 Apr 1891
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Fanny was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 29 December 1849. She married John Randolph Tucker , Jr. at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 29 April 1873. Fanny died on 10 March 1937 at age 87.

Family

John Randolph Tucker , Jr. d. 4 Jul 1880

Edward Tabb Crump

M, b. 21 December 1851, d. 17 February 1919
FatherWilliam Wood Crump b. 25 Nov 1819, d. 27 Feb 1897
MotherMary Susan Tabb b. 9 Nov 1824, d. 7 Apr 1891
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Edward was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 21 December 1851. Edward died on 17 February 1919 at age 67.1

Citations

  1. [S110] He died with no issue.

Mary (Little Birdie) Tabb Crump

F, b. 6 September 1856, d. 16 February 1861
FatherWilliam Wood Crump b. 25 Nov 1819, d. 27 Feb 1897
MotherMary Susan Tabb b. 9 Nov 1824, d. 7 Apr 1891
Last Edited22 Oct 2014
     Mary was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 6 September 1856.1 Mary died on 16 February 1861 at age 4.1 Her body was interred after 16 February 1861 at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, at Shockhoe Cemetery.1

Citations

  1. [S603] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Crump., Card 20 of 148 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/012/C0141).

William Wood Crump

M, b. 11 February 1858, d. 2 June 1862
FatherWilliam Wood Crump b. 25 Nov 1819, d. 27 Feb 1897
MotherMary Susan Tabb b. 9 Nov 1824, d. 7 Apr 1891
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     William was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 11 February 1858. William died on 2 June 1862 at age 4.1

Citations

  1. [S110] He died with no issue.

William Bernard Lightfoot

M, b. 16 March 1845, d. 16 January 1929
FatherJohn Bernard Lightfoot b. 24 Dec 1814, d. 10 Jul 1888
MotherHarriett Ann Field b. 28 Jun 1822, d. 11 Jun 1871
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     He served in the Confederate Army under General Fithugh Lee, in Company B, 9th Virginia Cavalry. He built "Waverly" on the Rappahannock River. William was born at Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, on 16 March 1845.1 He married Emmeline Allmond Crump at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 17 October 1871.2 William died on 16 January 1929 at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, at age 83.1

Family

Emmeline Allmond Crump b. 26 Dec 1849, d. 31 Oct 1937
Children

Citations

  1. [S1018] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 30.
  2. [S1020] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 40.

John Randolph Tucker , Jr.

M, d. 4 July 1880
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     John was born. He married Fanny Booth Crump at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 29 April 1873. John died on 4 July 1880.

Family

Fanny Booth Crump b. 29 Dec 1849, d. 10 Mar 1937

Harriet Field Lightfoot

F, b. 12 March 1875, d. 24 March 1939
FatherWilliam Bernard Lightfoot b. 16 Mar 1845, d. 16 Jan 1929
MotherEmmeline Allmond Crump b. 26 Dec 1849, d. 31 Oct 1937
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     Harriet was born at Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, on 12 March 1875.1 She married Dr. Edwin Booth Claybrook at St. James Ch., Richmond, Virginia, on 29 October 1901.1 Harriet died on 24 March 1939 at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, at age 64.1

Family

Dr. Edwin Booth Claybrook b. 16 Aug 1871, d. 28 Feb 1931
Child

Citations

  1. [S1021] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 42.

Dr. Edwin Booth Claybrook

M, b. 16 August 1871, d. 28 February 1931
Last Edited20 Mar 1997
     Dr.'s occupation: Physician.. Dr. was born at Westmoreland County, Virginia, on 16 August 1871. He married Harriet Field Lightfoot at St. James Ch., Richmond, Virginia, on 29 October 1901.1 Dr. died on 28 February 1931 at Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland, at age 59.

Family

Harriet Field Lightfoot b. 12 Mar 1875, d. 24 Mar 1939
Child

Citations

  1. [S1021] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 42.

John Bernard Lightfoot

M, b. 21 October 1876, d. 6 July 1948
FatherWilliam Bernard Lightfoot b. 16 Mar 1845, d. 16 Jan 1929
MotherEmmeline Allmond Crump b. 26 Dec 1849, d. 31 Oct 1937
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     John's occupation: Attorney.. John was born at Waverly, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, on 21 October 1876.1 He married Nan Mary Lemmon at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 20 April 1912.2 John died on 6 July 1948 at age 71.1

Citations

  1. [S1021] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 42.
  2. [S269] There was no issue from this marriage.

Nan Mary Lemmon

F
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Nan died. Nan was born. She married John Bernard Lightfoot at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, on 20 April 1912.1

Family

John Bernard Lightfoot b. 21 Oct 1876, d. 6 Jul 1948

Citations

  1. [S269] There was no issue from this marriage.

Marie Tabb Lightfoot

F, b. 10 May 1882, d. 9 February 1968
FatherWilliam Bernard Lightfoot b. 16 Mar 1845, d. 16 Jan 1929
MotherEmmeline Allmond Crump b. 26 Dec 1849, d. 31 Oct 1937
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     Marie was born at Waverly, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, on 10 May 1882.1 She married Thomas Brown , Jr. at St. James Ch., Richmond, Virginia, on 2 October 1918.2 Marie died on 9 February 1968 at age 85.2

Family

Thomas Brown , Jr. b. 1883, d. 24 Mar 1950
Child

Citations

  1. [S1021] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 42.
  2. [S1022] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 60.

Thomas Brown , Jr.

M, b. 1883, d. 24 March 1950
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     Thomas was born at Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1883.1 He married Marie Tabb Lightfoot at St. James Ch., Richmond, Virginia, on 2 October 1918.2 Thomas died on 24 March 1950.1

Family

Marie Tabb Lightfoot b. 10 May 1882, d. 9 Feb 1968
Child

Citations

  1. [S1023] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 63.
  2. [S1022] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 60.

William Crump Lightfoot

M, b. 13 January 1873, d. 23 June 1926
FatherWilliam Bernard Lightfoot b. 16 Mar 1845, d. 16 Jan 1929
MotherEmmeline Allmond Crump b. 26 Dec 1849, d. 31 Oct 1937
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     His body was interred at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia. William was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 13 January 1873.1 He was baptized on 23 March 1873. Religion:. William died on 23 June 1926 at age 53.1

Citations

  1. [S1021] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 42.

Evelyn Lightfoot Claybrook

F, b. 22 June 1907
FatherDr. Edwin Booth Claybrook b. 16 Aug 1871, d. 28 Feb 1931
MotherHarriet Field Lightfoot b. 12 Mar 1875, d. 24 Mar 1939
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Evelyn died. She married Gordon Lee Bowie. Evelyn was born at Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland, on 22 June 1907.

Emmy Lightfoot Brown

F, b. 5 July 1920
FatherThomas Brown , Jr. b. 1883, d. 24 Mar 1950
MotherMarie Tabb Lightfoot b. 10 May 1882, d. 9 Feb 1968
Last Edited15 Jan 2004
     Emmy died. Emmy was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 5 July 1920.1 She married Robert C. Brockway , Jr. on 24 March 1944.1

Family

Robert C. Brockway , Jr. b. 11 Apr 1918

Citations

  1. [S1023] Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 63.

Elizabeth Todd

F, b. 28 January 1723, d. 9 December 1788
FatherChristopher Todd b. 2 Apr 1690, d. 26 Mar 1743
MotherElizabeth Mason b. 25 Apr 1701, d. 10 Nov 1764
Last Edited19 Mar 1999
     She married Nathaniel Wythe.1 She married Mordecai Booth.1 Elizabeth was born on 28 January 1723.1 Elizabeth died on 9 December 1788 at age 65.1

Family 1

Mordecai Booth

Family 2

Nathaniel Wythe

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).

Thomas Todd

M, b. 26 December 1728, d. 22 July 1780
FatherChristopher Todd b. 2 Apr 1690, d. 26 Mar 1743
MotherElizabeth Mason b. 25 Apr 1701, d. 10 Nov 1764
Last Edited19 Mar 1999
     Thomas was born on 26 December 1728.1 Thomas died on 22 July 1780 at age 51.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).

Nathaniel Wythe

M
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     He married Elizabeth Todd.1 Nathaniel died. Nathaniel was born.

Family

Elizabeth Todd b. 28 Jan 1723, d. 9 Dec 1788

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).

Mary Wiatt

F, b. 1759
FatherJohn Wiatt , Jr. b. 15 May 1732, d. 5 Jan 1805
MotherMary Elizabeth Todd b. 5 Feb 1725, d. 9 Nov 1794
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Mary died. Mary was born in 1759.

John Todd Cocke Wiatt

M, b. circa 1781, d. circa 1850
FatherWilliam Edward Wiatt b. 17 Oct 1762, d. 26 Sep 1802
MotherMary Graham b. 2 May 1753, d. 1815
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     John was born circa 1781. He married Cecilia Dabney at Wake County, North Carolina, in 1816. John died circa 1850.

Lloyd Tabb Hubard

M, b. 6 July 1854
FatherWilliam James Hubard
MotherMary Troutman
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Lloyd died. Lloyd was born on 6 July 1854.

Martha Tabb Smith

F, b. 8 April 1840, d. 24 January 1874
FatherWilliam Patterson Smith b. 18 Jul 1796, d. 1878
MotherMarian Andrea Morson Seddon b. 26 Apr 1819, d. 19 May 1853
Last Edited24 May 2016
     Martha was born at Fredericksburg, Virginia, on 8 April 1840. She married Col. William Todd Robins at Ware Church, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 31 October 1862. Martha died on 24 January 1874 at age 33.

Henry Wythe Tabb Wilkins

M, b. 1863, d. 1939
FatherDr. John Wilkins
MotherLucia "Lucy" Cary Tabb b. 1 Feb 1838, d. 27 Mar 1889
Last Edited20 Mar 1997
     Henry was born in 1863. His body was interred in 1939 at Norfolk, Virginia, at Elmwood Cemetery.1 Henry died in 1939.

Citations

  1. [S111] Lot No. NW 1/4 74 - 4th A. West.

Margaret Arthur Tabb

F, b. September 1883, d. 1939
FatherArthur Wilson Tabb b. 27 Feb 1850, d. 19 Jan 1888
MotherKate Kemp Anderson b. 1854, d. 1927
Last Edited22 Nov 2001
     Margaret was born in September 1883. Her body was interred in 1939 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.1 Margaret died in 1939 at 'Newstead', Gloucester County, Virginia.

Citations

  1. [S870] Tombstone Observation.