Walter Gwynne Tabb

M, b. 10 January 1864, d. 21 January 1927
FatherThomas Smith Tabb b. 27 Mar 1827, d. 30 Aug 1892
MotherMary Adelaide (Ada) Billups b. 8 Mar 1838, d. 21 Jan 1900
Last Edited23 Sep 2021
     Walter was born at Matagorda County, Texas, on 10 January 1864.1 He married Willie Eunice Jones in 1892 at Harris County, Texas.1 Walter died on 21 January 1927 at Galveston, Galveston County, Texas, at age 63.1 He was buried after 21 January 1927 at Cedar Bayou United Methodist, Baytown, Harris County, Texas.1

Family

Willie Eunice Jones b. 25 Jan 1871, d. 28 Jul 1951
Children

John Prosser Tabb

M, b. 1 September 1822, d. 13 December 1884
FatherJohn Tabb b. 15 Sep 1784, d. 26 Apr 1860
MotherEvalina Matilda Prosser b. 5 Aug 1799, d. 6 Sep 1862
Last Edited25 Feb 2022
     John's occupation: Physician..1 John graduated at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. John Prosser Tabb served as a sergon in the Confederate Army.

The following story was written by Robert E. Lee, Jr. in his book Recollections and Letters of General Lee, origionally published in 1904. The story is on pages 407-410.

About thirty miles, as the crow flies, from my place, down York River, is situated, in Gloucester County, "White Marsh," an old Virginia home which then belonged to Dr. Prosser Tabb, who with his wife and children was living there. Mrs. Tabb was a near cousin of my father, and as a little girl had been a pet and favourite. His affection and regard for her had lasted from his early manhood. He had seen but little of her since the war, and when "Cousin Rebecca," as we all called her, learned he was to be at the "White House," she wrote begging him to pay her a visit. This he had agreed to do if it was possible.

While at the "White House," we had consulted together as to the best method of accomplishing this trip, and we determined to make it from "Romancoke." So I drove him to West Point, and there got aboard the Baltimore steamer, taking my horse and trap with us. At Cappahoosic, a wharf on the York, we landed and drove the nine miles to "White Marsh," arriving at "supper time," as we still say in Virginia--i.e., about 7:30 P.M.

When General Lee got off on the wharf, so great was the desire of the passengers and crew to see him, that they all went to the side of the boat, which caused her to list so that I was unable to get my horse out through the gangway until the captain had ordered everyone to the other side. As the sun went down, it became chilly and I drove quite rapidly, anxious to get my father out of the night air as soon as possible. He said nothing at the time, nor did I know that he noticed my unusual speed. But afterward he remarked on it to several persons, saying: "I think Rob drives unnecessarily fast."

We were expected, and were met at the door by all the family and guests. A hearty welcome was given us. After supper he was the centre of the circle in the drawingroom, and made the acquaintance of the children of the house and of the friends and relatives of the family who were there. He said little, but all listened eagerly to what he did say, and were charmed with his pleasant smile and gracious manner. "Cousin Rebecca" introduced him to her son-in-law, Captain Perrin, mentioning that he had been wounded in the war and was still lame from the effects. The General replied that at any rate he was all right now, for he had a pair of strong young feet to wait upon him, indicating his young wife.

As was customary in this section of Virginia, the house was full of visitors, and I shared my father's room and bed. Though many a year had passed since we had been bedfellows, he told me that he remembered well the time when, as a little fellow, I had begged for this privilege. The next day he walked about the beautiful gardens, and was driven over the plantation and shown the landscapes and water views of the immediate neighborhood. Mr. Graves, Dr. Tabb's overseer, who had the honour of being his coachman, fully appreciated it, and was delighted when my father praised his management. He had been a soldier under the General, and had stoutly carried his musket to Appomatox, where he surrendered it. When told of this by Dr. Tabb, my father took occasion to compliment him on his steadfast endurance and courage, but Graves simply and sincerely replied,

"Yes, General, I stuck to the army, but if you had in your entire command a greater coward then I was, you ought to have had him shot."

My father, who was greatly amused at his candour, spoke of it when he got back from his drive, saying "that sort of coward makes a good soldier."

That the drive had fatigued him was quite apparent to Cousin Rebecca, who begged him to go and lie down to rest, but he declined, though, finally, at her request, he consented to take a glass of wine. Mr. Tabb was anxious to give a good general reception that day in his honour, so that all the old soldiers in the country could have an opportunity of saking hands with him, but at the General's request the idea was abandoned.

Several persons were invited to meet him at dinner, among then the Rev. Mr. Phillips, and Englishman, the rector of Abingdon, an old Colonial church in the country. He and his wife were ardent admirers of General Lee, and had often expressed a great desire to see him, so Mrs. Tabb kindly gave them this opportunity. They were charmed with him, and, writing to their friends in England, declared:

"The greatest event in our lives has occurred-we have seen General Lee."

One of his young cousins, in talking with him, wondered what fate was in store for "us poor Virginians." The General replied with an earnest, softened look:

"You can work for Virginia, to build her up again, to make her great again. You can teach your children to love and cherish her."

I was struck with the tenderness of his manner to all these cousins, many of whom he had never seen before, and the real affection and interest he manifested toward them. He seemed pleased and touched by their love and kindness. I think he enjoyed his visit, but it was plain that he was easily fatigued.

To catch our steamer the next morning, an early start was necessary. Arrangements were made the night before, and all good-byes said, for we had to leave the house about five o'clock. That night he was very restless and wakeful, and remarked that it was generally so with him whenever he had to get up at an unusual hour, as he was always uneasy lest he might be late. However, we got off in full time--made the connection with our steamer, and returned immediately to "White House." I left the steamer at West Point to take my horse home, after which I joined him at the former place. John was born at 'Elmington', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 1 September 1822.2 He married Rebecca Lloyd on 2 May 1844.2 John died on 13 December 1884 at 'Ditchley', Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 62.3,2 His body was interred after 13 December 1884 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Rebecca Lloyd b. 7 Jun 1824, d. 17 Jul 1862
Children

Citations

  1. [S417] Source: Virginia Historical Magazine.
  2. [S552] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 130 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).
  3. [S416] Source: Virginia Historical Magazine.

Rebecca Lloyd

F, b. 7 June 1824, d. 17 July 1862
FatherJohn Harper Lloyd b. 16 Nov 1775, d. 22 Jul 1854
MotherAnne Harriotte Lee b. 6 Mar 1794, d. 10 Sep 1863
Last Edited25 Feb 2022
     Rebecca was born at Alexandria, Virginia, on 7 June 1824. She married John Prosser Tabb on 2 May 1844.1 Rebecca died on 17 July 1862 at 'Ditchley', Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 38. Her body was interred after 17 July 1862 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

John Prosser Tabb b. 1 Sep 1822, d. 13 Dec 1884
Children

Citations

  1. [S552] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 130 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Philip Tabb

M, b. 27 August 1830, d. 2 April 1901
FatherJohn Tabb b. 15 Sep 1784, d. 26 Apr 1860
MotherEvalina Matilda Prosser b. 5 Aug 1799, d. 6 Sep 1862
Last Edited13 Oct 2019
     Philip's occupation: Farmer and teacher.. Philip was born at Gloucester County, Virginia, on 27 August 1830. Philip graduated at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, in 1849. He married Katherine (Kate) Valentine Morris at Throgs Neck, New York, on 21 November 1854. Philip died on 2 April 1901 at age 70. His body was interred in April 1901 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Katherine (Kate) Valentine Morris
Children

Katherine (Kate) Valentine Morris

F
Last Edited13 Oct 2019
     Katherine died. Katherine was born at New York City, New York. She married Philip Tabb at Throgs Neck, New York, on 21 November 1854.

Family

Philip Tabb b. 27 Aug 1830, d. 2 Apr 1901
Children

John Tabb

M, b. 5 October 1846, d. 3 July 1921
FatherJohn Prosser Tabb b. 1 Sep 1822, d. 13 Dec 1884
MotherRebecca Lloyd b. 7 Jun 1824, d. 17 Jul 1862
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     John's occupation: School Principal. Source: 1900 Census of Gloucester County #/WF68 found at http://www.rootsweb.com/~vaggsv/vaggsv/census_1900_ware1.htm.. John was born at Alexandria, Virginia, on 5 October 1846. John graduated at Lexington, Virginia, in 1867.1 He married Judith Logan Coleman at 'Wood Lawn', Halifax County, Virginia, on 7 October 1868. He married Mary Sheppard James at Abingdon Episcopal Church, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 15 May 1883. John died on 3 July 1921 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 74. His body was interred in July 1921 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family 1

Judith Logan Coleman b. 20 Mar 1848, d. 1 Feb 1881
Children

Family 2

Mary Sheppard James b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 1 Feb 1936
Children

Citations

  1. [S38] He also graduated from the University of Virginia in 1866.

Judith Logan Coleman

F, b. 20 March 1848, d. 1 February 1881
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Judith was born at Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 March 1848. She married John Tabb at 'Wood Lawn', Halifax County, Virginia, on 7 October 1868. Judith died on 1 February 1881 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 32. Her body was interred in February 1881 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

John Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
Children

Mary Sheppard James

F, b. 6 September 1861, d. 1 February 1936
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     MEMORIES OF WAR DAYS by Mary James Tabb, "Summerville," February 1929.

"It is a fortunate thing I have never minded telling my age at any time, but since I have lately the honor of becoming a great-great- aunt, and our president of the Sally Tompkins Chapter, U.D.C., has asked me to tell my memories of War days, it would be useless, even if I wished to do so, to try to conceal my age.

I was born in Richmond, Virginia, on September 6, 1861. I lived there, with the exception of several short visits, all during the War. One of these visits to my father's uncle made a great impression on me. My uncle was a fine looking old gentleman with a long white beard. He used to tell me not to be afraid of the Yankees, because if they came he would hide me under his beard. When I wanted him to hid Mother, too, he told me that she could run away, which was but little comfort to me.

The sound of guns, and marching and long trains of wagons are the first things I can dimly remember. I did not like the soldiers: I called them "bum-bums," associating them with the boom of the cannon. My aunt had often sung to me the old Scotch songs, among them, "The Campbells Are Coming." She never knew the terror that this brought to my heart, for it seemed to me to mean, "the Yankees are coming."

As far back as I can remember my mother's face, I can remember that of Captain Sally Tompkins. We lived in her home while in Richmond. How well I remember sitting on my black mammy's lap on the porch of Captain Sally Tompkins' home and watching the train moving soldiers and prisoners coming into Richmond!

Captain Sally Tompkins took a house not far away from her home where we lived, and used this as a hospital for Gloucester and Mathews men. Later she found that she could not refuse any wounded soldiers, and so her hospital was soon filled to capacity, and many had to be turned away. It was then that she applied to President Davis to help her in feeding and caring for her soldiers. As he could not do this for anyone except a commissioned officer, he gave this noble woman a commission in the Confederate Army. This Commission to the end of her days was her most valued treasure. Though many homes were open to her during her later life, she chose to spend her last days in the Confederate Home for Women with the widows of her beloved soldiers.

Many sad things happened in Richmond during those years, and they made a great impression on my child's mind. There was the illness and death of President Davis' child who fell from the porch of his house, the "White House of the Confederacy." This house is not the Confederate Museum. I also recall the illness and death of Captain Sally Tompkins' sister, Cousin Maria Tompkins. She had been an old sweetheart of my father's, and she left me a very beautiful French piano. There was also the constant dread of finding husbands, brothers or sweethearts among the dead and wounded, brought in from the battlefields around Richmond.

There were also humorous incidents to brighten these dark days. One morning the son of a friend of my mother came rushing to her door in great excitement. "Oh, Mrs. James," he exclaimed, "don't you want sheep's head for dinner?" Mother being a Tidewater person, greatly appreciated this saltwater delicacy, and was pleased by the good news. So she gave him of her scanty store of money to buy the fish. Then she made preparations to cook it. When she heard her messenger's knock at the door, she started to open it eagerly. What was her horror to behold the head of a large sheep, covered with wool, and topped with horns, with large, glassy eyes staring at her! She managed, however, with the help of several other people, to make many savory dishes from this unsightly purchase.

I spoke of Mother's scanty store of money. Confederate money at this time was almost worthless. Mother had to pay $100 for one dozen eggs, and other things were in this proportion.

One of our neighbors across the street was Dr. Archie Taylor of Gloucester. One morning a cousin of his whom he called, "Sue," came by and asked Mother to go with her to his room. She intended to give him a good blowing up for failing to send her some coal. It was almost impossible to get supplies of any kind, and coal was especially difficult to obtain.

In answer to Sue's knock, Dr. Taylor called out, "Who is there? Is that you, Sue?"

"Yes," she answered. "I am glad I found you this time."

"Come right in; who is with you?"

"Martha James," replied "Sue."

"You had better stay outside, Mrs. James, but you come right in, Sue," replied Dr. Taylor.

She obeyed this cordial invitation, and once in his presence she began her tirade about his failure to send the promised coal. Just as she got in the midst of the most violent threats against him, he rose up in bed and called out:

"Run, Sue, I have varioloid!!"

Such scampering as there was no one ever saw before, and Dr. Taylor was not troubled by his cousin "Sue" for many days to come.

All houses in Richmond were crowded with persons from all over the country; wives of the soldiers and officers, and refugees from the more exposed places thronged the city. The houses were perfect "rookeries": no one had more than one room except in cases of desperate illness.

Mother's room was the meeting place for our many friends and relatives. My father was in Company D, 24th Virginia Cavalry, Colonel W. T. Robbins being in command. They were stationed at Camp Lee, where the Confederate Soldiers' Home is now located. There were many Gloucester and Mathews men stationed there. Among the friends who used to visit us often in our room were my mother's uncle, Colonel Warner T. Jones, Captain Richard M. Page, Major Peyton N. Page, Dr. Archie Taylor, Admiral Sidney Smith Lee, Confederate States Navy (brother of General Lee), Drs. R. W. and R. N. James (my father's brothers), Tazewell Thompson, Dr. J. Prosser Tabb and Captain John M. Brooke.

These doctors did excellent work in Richmond hospitals and elsewhere. It has always been a great pleasure to me to remember my two uncle doctors and Dr. Tabb, afterwards my father-in-law, who did so much for our beloved soldiers.

One of our dearest friends was Captain John. M. Brooke, mentioned in the paragraph above. Captain Brooke was assistant to Maury in the Naval Observatory. It was he who presented the plans to cover the Merrimac with railway iron, after which procedure it was renamed "The Virginia." Captain Brooke was thus the inventor of the first iron-clad ship. His wife was ill for a very long time, and Mother nursed her during her long illness.

The women of Gloucester did excellent work in their homes and elsewhere. Mr. Prosser Tabb and Mrs. William Booth Taliaferro formed a sewing society: women all over the country sewed, knitted and tore up sheets for bandages, and sent large boxes of clothes and provisions to the soldiers at Gloucester Point and Richmond. The homes of Gloucester were always open to sick and wounded soldiers. The women did all within their power to aid Dr. Philip A. Taliaferro in his hospital at Burgh Westra.

One morning a Gloucester friend of my mother, Mr. Heber Nelson, whose home, Glendale, was then on the Seven Pines battlefield, brought his ill aunt, Miss Prosser, and the rest of his family into Richmond, as he could not secure medical aid at his home. One of their beloved and valued family servants was too sick to be moved with the rest of the family, so they fixed her comfortably, and left servants to care for and nurse her. When the Yankees came to burn the house, they found this colored servant there too ill to be moved. So they left her in the house, and marched on without destroying the house, as they had intended doing. When this old sick servant heard the Yankees were coming, she directed her nurse to gather up the silver that had been left in the house in the hasty flight of the family, and she concealed it about her person in the bed. Some of this silver is in the Nelson family today.

One of Mother's most thrilling experiences of these days was in connection with Dahlgren's raid. About dust one evening Dr. Taylor came rushing into our room in his exciting way, bearing a package, which he seemed to value very highly.

"Mrs. James," he exclaimed. "I want you to take care of Dahlgren's leg!"

"Dahlgren's leg!" answered my mother. "Have you captured him? How thankful I am."

Dahlgren, a perfectly fearless, merciless man, had gathered together a body of men like himself, well fitted for his bloody work, and had raided several sections of the country. He was met at a hill near Stevensville in King and Queen County, now known as Dahlgren's Hill, by a determined party of men (many of whom were from Mathews and Gloucester Counties) and, after a fierce fight, was killed.

Richmond had been trembling in horror and dread for many days, and so the news of Dahlgren's capture and death was indeed good news to Mother. Dr. Taylor explained that he wanted to take the leg to the hospital to show the other doctors, as it was the most remarkable artificial limb in existence at this time. He wanted the Confederate surgeons to see the wonderful mechanism before it was buried with the owner. Mother agreed to take care of the leg for him, and it was placed under my crib in our crowded room. So it was that I slept over Dahlgren's leg for one whole night.

Dahlgren was first buried near the top of the hill which now bears his name, and then it was decided to take the body to Richmond for burial. All valuables found on his person were returned to his friends as soon as their address could be found. The orders found on his body were terrible - the less said of them the better. They are now in the Confederate Museum in Richmond. Later his friends removed his body to the North for his third burial.

The then gray line was becoming thinner and thinner every day, as men were taken away by death, or were ordered away from Richmond, to fill the terrible gaps made in the main line of defense. Few people realized, however, that the city was doomed to fall shortly. To many the calamity was entirely unexpected. A telegram was brought to President Davis at St. Paul's Church, where he regularly attended services, and a note from General Lee was given to Mr. Peterkin at St. James' Church.

How I wish that my mother were here to tell you in her dramatic and inimitable way of the harrowing experiences of that unforgettable time! The eve before Waterloo and the Fall of Troy were hardly more terrifying, for this was the end of the world for the Confederate people.

Mother soon collected herself, and with the help of Father and my uncle from Camp Lee, they began making preparations for flight. Through the help of Colonel Robbins, two broken down army mules, and a rickety old ambulance were obtained. All valuables, furniture, and everything that could not be easily carried with them were left behind. There was room for very little else except the two families, our uncle's and ours.

The members of our party were Mother, her sister, Mrs. Crigan, their younger sister, Fanny Curtis, who was seriously ill, my mammy Patsy, holding me in her arms, a colored boy, Miles, by name, who had been a wedding present to my mother from her father. There was a rush of people from the doomed city, wild cried, "The Yankees are coming by this road," explosions and shouts, loud cries and weeping women. The lower part of Richmond was set on fire by the Confederates to keep supplies, food and whiskey from falling into the hands of the conquerors.

Mother said that as she looked back on leaving her home, the flames were leaping skyward and they lighted their road far into the night. Father and my uncle had received permission from Colonel Robbins to go with us to Chickahominy Swamp to show Miles the best way to get over the dreadful road. Father often said in speaking of this experience, that parting at death would be nothing to him in comparison with the parting with Mother and the rest of us that awful night.

Now and then soldiers and parties of fugitives would pass us traveling out of the city, and sometimes a voice would call out, "Are you friends? Well, leave this road because the Yankees are coming this way."

"Who goes there?" called one voice.

"Friends." answered my aunt. "Is not that Warner Taliaferro?"

"It is," came the reply, "and I believe you are Hally Caringan."

Our cousin, Warner Taliaferro, had been given leave to go back to Gloucester to see his dying wife. When we met him he took the driver's place in our ambulance, putting Miles on his horse. He was most surely Heaven sent, for without his tender care and strong will I cannot see how we should ever have reached Gloucester. We had to travel very slowly on account of the illness of my aunt, the weak horses, and the heavy, muddy roads.

Late in the afternoon we reached a ferry on the Pamunkey River, in King William County, Piping Tree Ferry, I think it was. There we found a large house, almost empty. The owners were leaving, taking with them all their worldly goods to escape the Yankees who were expected to cross the ferry the next morning.

My aunt was unable to go any father, so we decided to camp in that house for the night. There were no beds or covers, but the kindly people shared with us what they had left of food. We met a Gloucester friend, Mr. John N. Tabb, who gave us his blanket for the sick girl. I shall never forget his kindness.

We made and early start the next morning, as the Yankees were said to be very near. I can remember only a few incidents on the trip, but there is one event which had been indelibly impressed upon my memory. When we reached the river shore, the ferry men were in absolute terror of the Yankees, and they refused to put us across. Cousin Warner tried every means to persuade them, even offering them large sums of money, but they would not budge. Finally Cousin Warner forced them at the point of a gun, threatening to shoot them if they continued to refuse. This impressed them; they yielded and carried us across the river.

All along the road people were ready to help us in every possible way. We pressed on until nearly nightfall, when we reached the home of Mr. Warner Roane. My aunt was so nearly exhausted that we decided to accept his hospitable offer to care for us as long as we could stay. Early the next morning we left his home, much against his will. His great kindness has never been forgotten by any of us to this day.

Some time that day we reached my grandfather's home, Wilson Creek, in Gloucester County. The welcome we received can be better imagined than described.

My grandfather's health had been failing for some time. His children had a great desire to send him to one of the Virginia springs, but could this be done without andy money? Some returning soldiers brought back from Richmond a few watches, rings and other valuables which Mother had hidden before she left the city. They were sold to my grandfather taken to the Springs. But all their sacrifices had been in vain - he died soon after our return. My sick aunt who had survived the trip from Richmond, had just passed away, so this double sorrow was a crushing blow.

When the news of my grandfather's death reached us, and that he had been buried so far away from us, the grief of the servants was past describing. They all gathered together, wept, wailed pitifully, singing over and over, "Massa's is the cold, cold ground."

Soon after my grandfather's death, Father, Mother and I went into our new home, "The Ship Yard," the place which my father had bought from Colonel Powhatan Page some years before. Grandmother gave us all that she could possibly spare in the way of furniture and food, but for a long time my bed was a big clothes basket, with Father's blue Yankee overcoat for cover. Father's aunt in Richmond succeeded in getting some Yankee soldiers to bring down to us from there some furniture that we had left there when the city had been evacuated. After that I slept in a real bed.

The visit of those soldiers I remember very clearly, for it frightened me very much. I thought the war had come again. Mother told me to come with her to get them some cool buttermilk and cornbread, which she gave them. This was the best of our diet in those days.

Father used to sing me the old war songs, "Dixie," "The Bonny Blue Flag," "If You Want to Have a Good Time, Jine the Cavalry," "Listen to the Mocking Bird," "Carry Me Back to Old Virginia," "My Maryland," and many more. These old songs still send thrills through my whole body when I hear them. Father used to tell me also many interesting stories of his war experiences, and of all these I liked that of the capture of John Brown the best. Father was a member of Company F, Richmond Howitzers, and in 1859 he was ordered with the Virginia State Troops under Major Wm. B. Taliaferro to Charlestown, West Virginia, to capture John Brown, who had seized the U. S. arsenal at Harper's Ferry. John Brown had been going through the country, trying to make the negroes rise up and murder their masters, and burn their homes. I have never heard of an instance of his accomplishing his horrible purpose.

John Brown spent the night at the home of an old friend of mine. He reached the house about dark, and asked for shelter. This was granted, and a servant was sent to help to take care of his horse. He was then invited in to supper. He disappeared directly after the meal, and when a boy was sent to make his fire in the morning, his room was found to be empty. One of the most faithful and trusted of the servants told my friend that directly after supper this man came to all of the negro quarters and tried to get them to kill their masters and flee with him. A Bible which had been on the table had disappeared. He seems to have mad but little use of it.

Father was stationed in the home of Colonel R. H. Lee, father of our own Rev. Wm. Byrd Lee. The whole company was hospitably entertained in Charlestown. John Brown had been captured and was in jail in the city. The night before he was hanged there was wild excitement and dread, for it was supposed that the negroes everywhere would rise, and it would be necessary to guard John Brown. The soldiers were completely armed, and each carried a Bowie knife. The negroes, instead of rising and causing trouble, rushed into the homes of their white Southern friends and begged for protection from the Yankees.

Right here I should like to tell of the fate of the Bowie knife which Father brought home, and which he used to excite greatly my imagination. Father used it for may years for taking honey. Finally, my little brother lost it over the side of a boat when he was using it to cut up crabmeat for bait.

"Your swords shall be turned into pruning hooks."

After the war when General Lee was visiting the home of some of his cousins in Gloucester, a young son of the family asked him, "What can we do for Virginia now?"

"You can help build her up again," replied the general. "Make her strong again, and you can teach her children to love her and cherish her."

I trust that you shall always honor those who died for their principles, and those who laid down their arms in good faith, and in the dark days od reconstruction, under the most humiliating conditions, went bravely on in the battle of life. And may always be faithful to our heritage of loyalty, and honor and devotion, and so we may follow in the footsteps of our beloved chieftain, Robert Edward Lee."


Source: The above material was contained in Tyler's Quarterly Magazine, Volume 28, 1946-47, pages 79-86. Mary was born at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on 6 September 1861. She married John Tabb at Abingdon Episcopal Church, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 15 May 1883. Mary died on 1 February 1936 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 74. Her body was interred in February 1936 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

John Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
Children

Evelina Matilda (Maud) Tabb

F, b. 12 August 1849, d. 1 January 1925
FatherJohn Prosser Tabb b. 1 Sep 1822, d. 13 Dec 1884
MotherRebecca Lloyd b. 7 Jun 1824, d. 17 Jul 1862
Last Edited21 Jan 2001
     Her body was interred at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. Evelina was born at Alexander, Upsher County, Virginia, on 12 August 1849. She married John Tayloe Perrin on 20 October 1869.1 Evelina died on 1 January 1925 at age 75.

Family

John Tayloe Perrin b. 27 Dec 1836, d. 25 Feb 1904
Children

Citations

  1. [S553] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 131 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

John Tayloe Perrin

M, b. 24 February 1875, d. 19 November 1931
FatherWilliam Kennon Perrin II b. 6 Nov 1834, d. 29 Nov 1904
MotherLucy Wellford Jones b. 3 Sep 1840, d. 26 May 1925
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     John's occupation: Writer.. John was born on 24 February 1875. His body was interred in November 1931 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. John died on 19 November 1931 at age 56.

Rebecca Lloyd Tabb

F, b. 12 August 1849, d. 1917
FatherJohn Prosser Tabb b. 1 Sep 1822, d. 13 Dec 1884
MotherRebecca Lloyd b. 7 Jun 1824, d. 17 Jul 1862
Last Edited28 Jul 1999
     She married Samuel Gordon Brent.1 Rebecca was born on 12 August 1849. Rebecca died in 1917.

Citations

  1. [S553] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 131 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Samuel Gordon Brent

M
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     He married Rebecca Lloyd Tabb.1 Samuel died. Samuel was born at Alexandria, Virginia.

Family

Rebecca Lloyd Tabb b. 12 Aug 1849, d. 1917
Children

Citations

  1. [S553] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 131 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

John Prosser Tabb

M, b. 27 November 1854, d. 29 January 1927
FatherJohn Prosser Tabb b. 1 Sep 1822, d. 13 Dec 1884
MotherRebecca Lloyd b. 7 Jun 1824, d. 17 Jul 1862
Last Edited17 Jul 2012
     He married Nellie Mackenzie. John was born on 27 November 1854. John died on 29 January 1927 at age 72. His body was interred after 29 January 1927 at Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia, at Sharon Cemetery.

Family

Nellie Mackenzie b. 24 Aug 1861, d. 24 Jul 1926
Children

Nellie Mackenzie

F, b. 24 August 1861, d. 24 July 1926
Last Edited17 Jul 2012
     She married John Prosser Tabb. Nellie was born at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, on 24 August 1861. Nellie died on 24 July 1926 at age 64. Her body was interred after 24 July 1926 at Middleburg, Loudoun County, Virginia, at Sharon Cemetery.

Family

John Prosser Tabb b. 27 Nov 1854, d. 29 Jan 1927
Children

John Lloyd Tabb

M, b. 6 August 1851, d. 26 May 1922
FatherJohn Prosser Tabb b. 1 Sep 1822, d. 13 Dec 1884
MotherRebecca Lloyd b. 7 Jun 1824, d. 17 Jul 1862
Last Edited31 Dec 2014
     John was born at Gloucester County, Virginia, on 6 August 1851.1 He married Susan Selden at "Sherwood", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 6 March 1877.2 John died on 26 May 1922 at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, at age 70.2 His body was interred on 29 May 1922 at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, at Green Mount Cemetery.3

Family

Susan Selden b. 22 Apr 1852, d. 2 Apr 1926
Children

Citations

  1. [S1088] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi
  2. [S547] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 124 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).
  3. [S39] Hemlock, Lot 36.

Susan Selden

F, b. 22 April 1852, d. 2 April 1926
Last Edited11 Jun 2018
     Susan was born at 'Sherwood', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 22 April 1852.1 She married John Lloyd Tabb at "Sherwood", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 6 March 1877.2 Susan died on 2 April 1926 at Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, at age 73.1 Her body was interred on 4 April 1926 at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, at Green Mount Cemetery. Hemlock, Lot 36..1

Family

John Lloyd Tabb b. 6 Aug 1851, d. 26 May 1922
Children

Citations

  1. [S631] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 100 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  2. [S547] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 124 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Alice Syndor Tabb

F, b. 24 October 1869, d. 16 November 1923
FatherJohn Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
MotherJudith Logan Coleman b. 20 Mar 1848, d. 1 Feb 1881
Last Edited18 Mar 1997
     Alice was born at 'Summerville', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 24 October 1869. She married Thaddeus Ernest Duval at Ware Church, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 10 October 1894. Her body was interred in November 1923 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. Alice died on 16 November 1923 at age 54.

Family

Thaddeus Ernest Duval b. 29 Mar 1869, d. 4 Apr 1962
Children

Thaddeus Ernest Duval

M, b. 29 March 1869, d. 4 April 1962
FatherJohn Robert Duval
MotherLaura Cordelia Pagend
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Thaddeus was born at Gloucester County, Virginia, on 29 March 1869. He married Alice Syndor Tabb at Ware Church, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 10 October 1894. Thaddeus died on 4 April 1962 at age 93. His body was interred in April 1962 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Alice Syndor Tabb b. 24 Oct 1869, d. 16 Nov 1923
Children

John Tabb

M, b. 26 April 1871, d. 3 July 1941
FatherJohn Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
MotherJudith Logan Coleman b. 20 Mar 1848, d. 1 Feb 1881
Last Edited28 May 2013
     John's occupation: Attorney. Source: 1900 Census of Gloucester County #/WF68 found at http://www.rootsweb.com/~vaggsv/vaggsv/census_1900_ware1.htm.. John was born at 'Summerville', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 26 April 1871. John died on 3 July 1941 at age 70. His body was interred after 3 July 1941 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.1

Rebecca Lloyd Tabb

F, b. 6 January 1875, d. 18 January 1916
FatherJohn Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
MotherJudith Logan Coleman b. 20 Mar 1848, d. 1 Feb 1881
Last Edited14 Mar 2014
     Rebecca was born at 'Summerville', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 6 January 1875. She married Henry Wood Bouldin at Ware Church, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 22 June 1911. Rebecca died on 18 January 1916 at Virginia at age 41. Her body was interred after 18 January 1916 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Henry Wood Bouldin b. 3 Nov 1857, d. Aug 1935

Thaddeus Ernest Duval

M, b. 19 June 1895
FatherThaddeus Ernest Duval b. 29 Mar 1869, d. 4 Apr 1962
MotherAlice Syndor Tabb b. 24 Oct 1869, d. 16 Nov 1923
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Thaddeus died. Thaddeus was born at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, on 19 June 1895.

Harriet Tabb

F, b. 20 March 1854, d. 25 May 1854
FatherThomas M. Tabb b. 16 Jul 1820, d. 7 Sep 1886
MotherMaria Louisa Smith b. 9 Jan 1825, d. 9 Feb 1893
Last Edited15 Nov 2016
     Harriet was born at Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Virginia, on 20 March 1854.1 Harriet died on 25 May 1854 at Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Virginia.1 Her body was interred after 25 May 1854 at Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Virginia, at Oak Grove Cemetery.1

John Tabb Duval

M, b. 18 June 1897, d. 20 February 1954
FatherThaddeus Ernest Duval b. 29 Mar 1869, d. 4 Apr 1962
MotherAlice Syndor Tabb b. 24 Oct 1869, d. 16 Nov 1923
Last Edited22 Nov 2001
     John was born at at Catlett's, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 18 June 1897. He married Mollie Taliaferro in 1924. His body was interred in February 1954 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. John died on 20 February 1954 at age 56.

Family

Mollie Taliaferro b. 22 Jan 1900, d. 29 May 1991

Joseph James Tabb

M, b. 10 December 1885, d. 22 June 1953
FatherJohn Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
MotherMary Sheppard James b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 1 Feb 1936
Last Edited12 May 2015
     Joseph was born at 'Summerville', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 10 December 1885. He was baptized on 16 March 1886. Religion:. He married Sallie Hines Fore on 16 October 1919. Joseph died on 22 June 1953 at age 67. His body was interred after 22 June 1953 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Sallie Hines Fore b. 8 Apr 1885, d. Mar 1975

Mary Lee Tabb

F, b. 20 May 1887, d. 2 November 1980
FatherJohn Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
MotherMary Sheppard James b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 1 Feb 1936
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     Mary was born at 'Summerville', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 20 May 1887. She was christened on 23 May 1887. Mary died on 2 November 1980 at age 93. Her body was interred in November 1980 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Warner Throckmorton Tabb

M, b. 1 September 1888, d. 1 September 1978
FatherJohn Tabb b. 5 Oct 1846, d. 3 Jul 1921
MotherMary Sheppard James b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 1 Feb 1936
Last Edited16 Jan 2022
Warner Throckmorton Tabb
     Warner's occupation: Engineer and writer.. During World War I, Warner Throckmorton Tabb taught engineering subjects at the University of Cincinnati. While there, as a private in the U.S. Army, he trained electricians for France. He contributed to various manufacturing employers including Eisemann Magneto, Westinghouse, and Mack Trucks. He wrote THE ATOMYSTIC WAY, chapter free verse poem (fifteen years in the writing), and thereafter wrote short poems for THE LYRIC and other magazines. He wrote the poetry volumes LISTENING VOICE and WONDERING SEED, which were printed for him by White and Shepperson. Warner was born at 'Summerville', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 1 September 1888. He was baptized on 4 December 1888. Religion:. Warner graduated at Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia, in 1912. He married Elizabeth Weyman Minor at Community Church, New York, on 11 June 1919. Warner died on 1 September 1978 at Tappahannock, Essex County, Virginia, at age 90.1,2 His body was interred after 1 September 1978 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Elizabeth Weyman Minor b. 1897, d. 1951

Citations

  1. [S40] (Tombstone & American Tabbs Since the Civil War, The Tabb Family News.).
  2. [S1088] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

Ann Harriette Lee Perrin

F, b. 19 December 1871, d. 1 May 1938
FatherJohn Tayloe Perrin b. 27 Dec 1836, d. 25 Feb 1904
MotherEvelina Matilda (Maud) Tabb b. 12 Aug 1849, d. 1 Jan 1925
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     Ann was born at Gloucester County, Virginia, on 19 December 1871. Ann died on 1 May 1938 at age 66. Her body was interred in May 1938 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Rebecca Lloyd Perrin

F, b. 25 December 1873, d. 6 August 1913
FatherJohn Tayloe Perrin b. 27 Dec 1836, d. 25 Feb 1904
MotherEvelina Matilda (Maud) Tabb b. 12 Aug 1849, d. 1 Jan 1925
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     Rebecca was born on 25 December 1873. Rebecca died on 6 August 1913 at age 39. Her body was interred in August 1913 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Marion Tayloe Perrin

M
FatherJohn Tayloe Perrin b. 27 Dec 1836, d. 25 Feb 1904
MotherEvelina Matilda (Maud) Tabb b. 12 Aug 1849, d. 1 Jan 1925
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Marion died. Marion was born.

Eleanor Wormley Perrin

F, b. 1 July 1883, d. 3 September 1975
FatherJohn Tayloe Perrin b. 27 Dec 1836, d. 25 Feb 1904
MotherEvelina Matilda (Maud) Tabb b. 12 Aug 1849, d. 1 Jan 1925
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     Eleanor was born at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, on 1 July 1883. Eleanor died on 3 September 1975 at age 92. Her body was interred in September 1975 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.