William Cary Williams

M, b. 24 December 1854, d. 19 April 1892
Last Edited15 Jul 2018
     William was born on 24 December 1854.1 He married Frances Hughes Tabb on 12 May 1883.2 His body was interred in April 1892 at Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Virginia, at Oak Grove Cemetery.1 William died on 19 April 1892 at age 37.1

Family

Frances Hughes Tabb b. 17 Aug 1857, d. 11 Oct 1896
Children

Citations

  1. [S744] Page 28.
  2. [S406] Source: William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol XIII, 1904-1905, page 128.
  3. [S1136] Source: Email message from Debbie Cubbedge (e-mail address) dated 09 November 04.

Robert Henry Armistead

M, b. 1802
FatherRobert Armistead d. Mar 1810
MotherPriscilla Tabb b. 16 Jan 1768, d. 5 Dec 1825
Last Edited12 Nov 2013
     Robert died.1 Robert was born in 1802.

Citations

  1. [S31] He died as an infant.

Anna Tabb

F
FatherThomas Tabb , Jr. b. 18 Dec 1730, d. 1759
Mother(---?---) (---?---)
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Anna died. Anna was born. She married John Nash III at Lunenburg County, Virginia, on 1 November 1780.

John Nash III

M
Last Edited2 Apr 1997
     John died. John was born at Pembroke, Prince Edward County, Virginia. He married Anna Tabb at Lunenburg County, Virginia, on 1 November 1780.

John Tabb

M, d. 1743
FatherJohn Thomas Tabb b. b 12 Nov 1676, d. 1739
MotherMartha Purefoy Hand b. 1676, d. 1739
Last Edited18 Nov 2001
     John was born at Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, Virginia.1 He married Mary Ann Allaman. John died in 1743.

Citations

  1. [S867] Source: Margie Wellwood (D e-mail address) in an e-mail dated 17 November 2001.

Mary Ann Allaman

F, d. 1742
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     She married John Tabb. Mary was born. Mary died in 1742.

Family

John Tabb d. 1743
Children

Edward Tabb

M, b. 3 February 1719, d. 29 January 1782
FatherJohn Thomas Tabb b. b 12 Nov 1676, d. 1739
MotherMartha Purefoy Hand b. 1676, d. 1739
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     Edward was born at 'Seaford', Gloucester County, Virginia, on 3 February 1719.1,2,3 He married Lucy Todd on 11 November 1749.1,2,3 His body was interred in January 1782 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. Edward died on 29 January 1782 at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 62.1,2,3

Family

Lucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S488] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 28 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Lucy Todd

F, b. 20 November 1721, d. 18 February 1794
FatherChristopher Todd b. 2 Apr 1690, d. 26 Mar 1743
MotherElizabeth Mason b. 25 Apr 1701, d. 10 Nov 1764
Last Edited17 Mar 1999
     Lucy was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 20 November 1721.1,2,3 She married Edward Tabb on 11 November 1749.1,2,4 Her body was interred in February 1794 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. Lucy died on 18 February 1794 at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 72.1,2

Family

Edward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S560] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K, Card 7 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  4. [S488] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 28 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Col. Thomas Tabb

M, b. 3 February 1719, d. 27 November 1769
FatherJohn Thomas Tabb b. b 12 Nov 1676, d. 1739
MotherMartha Purefoy Hand b. 1676, d. 1739
Last Edited4 Mar 2015
Haw Branch Plantation
     Thomas Tabb came to Amelia County from Gloucester County and was living in Amelia County when the county was created from Prince George County. He resided at "Clay Hill," in Amelia County, Virginia.

Thomas was called the richest merchant in Virginia and was a member of the firm Rumbold, Walker and Tabb. This company handled tobacco on consignment, imported slaves, built and chartered ships, and carried on an extensive trade with England. He had a number of stores west and southwest of Amelia.

At various times, Thomas Tabb was Justice and Sheriff of Amelia County and was the county's representative in the Virginia House of Burgesses at Williamsburg for a number of years. He rose to the rank of Colonel in the Militia, and in 1758, he was appointed one of the Commissioners for Amelia and Prince Edward Counties to examine, state and settle accounts of provisions, and to pay off militia and damages done to the Colony's inhabitants by the Cherokee and Catawaba Indians.

Virginia had no banks at this time because the Crown and Colonial Assemblies forbade it. When opposition appeared to wane, formation of the Virginia James River Bank got underway, and plans progressed to the point that Colonel Tabb brought metal plates to Virginia for notes that the bank would use. King George II refused permission. All was not in vane, however, for in 1773 counterfeit English notes began to be circulated, and the Assembly approved the use of the Virginia James River Bank notes that Tabb had obtained, after the denomination had been filled in by hand on each note's face, and the back had been printed; there was a provision, however, that the notes were to be replaced by June 1774, by other notes on English paper. Then, in 1775, the notes were used again because of a paper shortage.

Thomas Tabb died on November 27, 1769, at his Amelia County home "Clay Hill" after several years' struggle with a heart condition called dropsy in those days. He was buried in the Tabb family graveyard at his home. His obituary in a Williamsburg newspaper said, "Few, if any, Virginians traded so extensively as he did; none with better credit for character, and by his death the colony hath lost one of its most useful members.

Most of the above information came from Historical Notes on Amelia County, Virginia, published by the Amelia County Historical Society. He married Elizabeth Marianna Mayo.1 Col. was born on 3 February 1719. He married Rebecca Booker at Amelia County, Virginia, on 10 April 1736.2 Col. died on 27 November 1769 at 'Clay Hill', Amelia County, Virginia, at age 50.1,3 He was buried after 27 November 1769 at Tabb Cemetery, Haw Branch, Amelia County, Virginia.4

Family 2

Rebecca Booker b. 1710, d. 27 Nov 1769
Children

Citations

  1. [S402] Source: William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol XIII, 1904-1905, page 126.
  2. [S618] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 84 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  3. [S637] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 110 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  4. [S1088] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

Elizabeth Marianna Mayo

F
FatherJoseph Mayo
MotherAnn (---?---)
Last Edited2 Nov 2015
     She married Col. Thomas Tabb.1 Elizabeth Marianna Mayo was buried at Tabb Cemetery, Haw Branch, Amelia County, Virginia; From the research of Gibson Jefferson McConnaughey gathered from newspaper obituaries and family letters, Elizabeth Mayo Tabb, the second wife of Col. Thomas Tabb, is known to be buried in this cemetery which is located on the property of Clay Hill Plantation, not Haw Branch Plantation. This cemetery is located on private property. There are only 2 graves marked with carved stones. This grave is not marked.2 Elizabeth was born. Elizabeth died.

Family

Col. Thomas Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 27 Nov 1769
Child

Citations

  1. [S402] Source: William & Mary College Quarterly, Vol XIII, 1904-1905, page 126.
  2. [S1088] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

Rebecca Booker

F, b. 1710, d. 27 November 1769
Last Edited4 Mar 2015
     Rebecca was born at Gloucester County, Virginia, in 1710.1,2 She married Col. Thomas Tabb at Amelia County, Virginia, on 10 April 1736.1 Rebecca died on 27 November 1769. She was buried after 27 November 1769 at Tabb Cemetery, Haw Branch, Amelia County, Virginia.2

Family

Col. Thomas Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 27 Nov 1769
Children

Citations

  1. [S618] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 84 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  2. [S1088] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

Philip Tabb

M, b. 6 November 1750, d. 25 February 1822
FatherEdward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
MotherLucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Last Edited7 Dec 2010
     Philip Tabb inhereted "Toddsbury" from his maternal Uncle Christopher Todd. Philip Tabb served as a lieutenant in the Revolution.

The following letter was furnished to me by C. T. Field, Jr. of Gloucester, Virginia, in November 1993. It comes from the William Patterson Smith papers at the Duke University Library and shows that the Revolution did not quite end at Yorktown in 1781. The letter was written to Col. John Page of Roswell.

Sir North River 9th Dec 1782

I am informed by Lieut. Hudgins that six British Barges cont. about 300 men came yesterday into the thorough fare between Gwyns Island and the mainland at the house of Rich. Brooks who they robbed and from there marched about a mile to Mr Laines. This poor gent. they left destitute of every thing but his house and land taking all his slaves, household goods and wearing appearal. Mr. Hudgins collected about 30 men with which he fired on a Barge that was moving up Sluts Creek. He instantly returned to the rest in the Haven and the whole of them now lie at the lower end of Gwyns Island. I have now to inform that out men have not a round of ammunition left and in this situation we are now exposed to the ravages of perhaps the vilest wretches ever collected in such numbers. Ammunition is all we want to keep them at bay. If that cannot be had we must expect to suffer more from this miserable crew than we have done since the commencement of the War. I wait impatiently to know whether we can be enabled to oppose these Bandits and am in the interim with respect, Sir.

Your most ob. Hble. Svt.

Philip Tabb

Mr. Hudgins is informed these Barges had an engagement five days since with those from Maryland that the Commadore of the Sallie unfortunately blew up. The rest returned to Cheriton on the eastern shore. Philip was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 6 November 1750.1,2,3,4 He married Mary Mason Wythe at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 7 December 1780.3,5 His body was interred in February 1822 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. Philip died on 25 February 1822 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 71.1,6,2,4

Family

Mary Mason Wythe b. 7 Sep 1751, d. 22 Sep 1814
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S422] Source: Record written by John Henry Tabb and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86.
  3. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  4. [S611] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 73 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  5. [S598] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Booth, Card 111 of 184 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/005/B0058).
  6. [S420] Source: Death Notices From Richmond, Virginia Newspapers 1821-1840, The Virginia Genealogical Society, Special Publication Number 9.

Mary Mason Wythe

F, b. 7 September 1751, d. 22 September 1814
FatherNathaniel Wythe
MotherElizabeth Todd
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     She married (---?---) Booth. Mary was born on 7 September 1751.1,2 She married Philip Tabb at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 7 December 1780.1,2 Her body was interred in September 1814 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.2 Mary died on 22 September 1814 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 63.1,2

Family 1

(---?---) Booth

Family 2

Philip Tabb b. 6 Nov 1750, d. 25 Feb 1822
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  2. [S598] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Booth, Card 111 of 184 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/005/B0058).

Lucy Tabb

F, b. 25 March 1753, d. 14 January 1824
FatherEdward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
MotherLucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Last Edited7 Dec 2010
     Mrs. Lucy Cary, the widow of Dudley Cary, of Gloucester, Va., was among the earleiest settlers of Athens [, Georgia]. She was such a lady as we may suppose Mary Washington to have been. She knew General Washington and his wife well as well as most other distinguished Virginians in her young days. Her manners were formed from the best models of Virginia society - gentle, courteous, dignified, cheerful - as kind to one of her slaves as to a white person of the same age; and the result was that her slaves not only loved and respected her but prided themselves in belonging to an old Virginia family.

      Source: Annals of Athens, Georgia, 1801-1901, by Augustus Longstreet Hull, printed in 1906, Copyright 1978, Mary B. Warren, Heritage Papers, Danielsville, Georgia. Lucy was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 25 March 1753.1,2 She married Dudley Cary at Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 11 November 1775.3,2 Lucy died on 14 January 1824 at Athens, Georgia, at age 70.4 Her body was interred in January 1824 at Athens, Georgia, at Oconnee Hills Cemetery.5

Family

Dudley Cary b. c 1756, d. 24 Jan 1804
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S336] Source: William and Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. 13, No. 3, page 98.
  4. [S678] Source: Chart provided by Rosa Thornley, 9280 N. 11600 W., Tremonton, UT 84337 (e-mail address) during December 1999.
  5. [S459] Source: E-mail from Rosa Thornley (e-mail address) dated 22 July 1999 to George E. Tabb, Jr.

Dudley Cary

M, b. circa 1756, d. 24 January 1804
Last Edited14 Dec 1999
     Dudley was born at Virginia circa 1756. He married Lucy Tabb at Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, Virginia, on 11 November 1775.1,2 Dudley died on 24 January 1804 at Clarke County, Georgia.

Family

Lucy Tabb b. 25 Mar 1753, d. 14 Jan 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S336] Source: William and Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. 13, No. 3, page 98.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).

Thomas Tabb

M, b. 26 September 1755, d. 20 July 1818
FatherEdward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
MotherLucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Last Edited31 Jul 1999
     Thomas was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 26 September 1755.1,2 He married Elizabeth Harmonson Teackle at Northampton County, Virginia, on 27 December 1790.3 Thomas died on 20 July 1818 at "Seaford", Mathews County, Virginia, at age 62.2

Family

Elizabeth Harmonson Teackle b. 29 Nov 1775, d. 3 Dec 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  2. [S634] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 104 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  3. [S489] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 29 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Elizabeth Harmonson Teackle

F, b. 29 November 1775, d. 3 December 1824
FatherCaleb Teackle
MotherElizabeth Curtis
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     Elizabeth was born on 29 November 1775. She married Thomas Tabb at Northampton County, Virginia, on 27 December 1790.1 Elizabeth died on 3 December 1824 at 'Seaford', Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 49.

Family

Thomas Tabb b. 26 Sep 1755, d. 20 Jul 1818
Children

Citations

  1. [S489] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 29 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Martha Tabb

F, b. 21 October 1757, d. 16 September 1821
FatherEdward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
MotherLucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Last Edited24 May 2016
     Martha was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 21 October 1757.1,2,3 She married Rev. Armistead Smith on 13 January 1780.2,3,4 Martha died on 16 September 1821 at Bellvue, Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 63.2 Her body was interred after 16 September 1821 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Rev. Armistead Smith b. 3 Dec 1756, d. 12 Sep 1817
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S422] Source: Record written by John Henry Tabb and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86.
  3. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  4. [S489] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 29 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Rev. Armistead Smith

M, b. 3 December 1756, d. 12 September 1817
Last Edited31 Oct 2001
     Rev.'s occupation: Minister.. He was the founder of Phi Beta Kappa Society at William and Mary College. Source: The Descendants of Stephen Field of King and Queen County, Virginia 1721 by Alex L. Wiatt, page 24. Rev. was born on 3 December 1756. He married Martha Tabb on 13 January 1780.1,2,3 Rev. died on 12 September 1817 at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 60.1 His body was interred in September 1817 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Martha Tabb b. 21 Oct 1757, d. 16 Sep 1821
Children

Citations

  1. [S422] Source: Record written by John Henry Tabb and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S489] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 29 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Elizabeth Smith Tabb

F, b. 31 July 1760, d. 14 November 1824
FatherEdward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
MotherLucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Last Edited17 Mar 1999
     Elizabeth was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 31 July 1760.1,2 She married John Patterson on 3 December 1791.1,2 Elizabeth died on 14 November 1824 at 'Poplar Grove', Mathews County, Virginia, at age 64.1

Family

John Patterson b. 2 Jul 1760, d. 1 Aug 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).

John Patterson

M, b. 2 July 1760, d. 1 August 1824
Last Edited18 Jun 2015
     John Patterson was the son of William Patterson and _______ Akers. They brought him to this country at an early age, and both died of an epidemic (yellow fever) in Norfolk, Virginia, leaving two sons, John and William. John was only fifteen years of age when he ran away from his guardian, accompanied by William, and offered his services to Washington at Valley Forge, and both were accepted. William was killed at the Battle of Monmouth, and John was breveted by Washington for distinguished bravery. He found and brought William's body from the battle field. His guardian succeeded in having him transferred to the Navy, and he served for the remainder of the War on board ship. He formed a lasting friendship with Commodore James Barron and LaFayette.

He built the handsome home known as Poplar Grove in Mathews County, which he named in honor of the sign and symbol of the Whigs, in which he was a prominent leader. John was born at England on 2 July 1760.1 He married Elizabeth Smith Tabb on 3 December 1791.1,2 John died on 1 August 1824 at 'Isleham', Mathews County, Virginia, at age 64.1 His body was interred in August 1824 at Mathews County, Virginia, at 'Isleham'.1

Family

Elizabeth Smith Tabb b. 31 Jul 1760, d. 14 Nov 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S415] Source: The Todd Family. This is a document housed in the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA , document number Mss/Sm 56Sa142-149.
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).

Paulina Tabb

F, b. 10 June 1766, d. 6 April 1794
FatherEdward Tabb b. 3 Feb 1719, d. 29 Jan 1782
MotherLucy Todd b. 20 Nov 1721, d. 18 Feb 1794
Last Edited13 Sep 2000
     She married George Wythe Booth.1 Paulina was born at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, on 10 June 1766.2,3 Paulina died on 6 April 1794 at "Toddsbury", Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 27.2,3 Her body was interred in April 1794 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Citations

  1. [S489] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 29 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).
  2. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S610] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Booth, Card 121 of 184 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/005/B0058).

George Wythe Booth

M
Last Edited30 Jan 1997
     He married Paulina Tabb.1 George died. George was born.

Family

Paulina Tabb b. 10 Jun 1766, d. 6 Apr 1794

Citations

  1. [S489] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 29 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Thomas Todd Tabb

M, b. 4 December 1782, d. 20 June 1835
FatherPhilip Tabb b. 6 Nov 1750, d. 25 Feb 1822
MotherMary Mason Wythe b. 7 Sep 1751, d. 22 Sep 1814
Last Edited23 Apr 2009
Thomas Todd Tabb
     He married Elizabeth C. Forman. Thomas was born on 4 December 1782.1 He married Lucy Armistead Smith on 15 December 1803.2 His body was interred in June 1835 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church. Thomas died on 20 June 1835 at Toddsbury, Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 52.3,1

Family 1

Lucy Armistead Smith b. 30 Aug 1783, d. 14 Nov 1821
Children

Family 2

Elizabeth C. Forman b. 1798, d. 1 Jul 1851
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  2. [S424] Source: This is an exact copy of Edward Dabney's copy of the Todd Bible, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S420] Source: Death Notices From Richmond, Virginia Newspapers 1821-1840, The Virginia Genealogical Society, Special Publication Number 9.

Lucy Armistead Smith

F, b. 30 August 1783, d. 14 November 1821
FatherRev. Armistead Smith b. 3 Dec 1756, d. 12 Sep 1817
MotherMartha Tabb b. 21 Oct 1757, d. 16 Sep 1821
Last Edited24 May 2016
     Lucy was born on 30 August 1783.1 She married Thomas Todd Tabb on 15 December 1803.2 Lucy died on 14 November 1821 at Toddsbury, Gloucester County, Virginia, at age 38.3,4,1 Her body was interred after 14 November 1821 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Thomas Todd Tabb b. 4 Dec 1782, d. 20 Jun 1835
Children

Citations

  1. [S559] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K, Card 5 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  2. [S424] Source: This is an exact copy of Edward Dabney's copy of the Todd Bible, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  3. [S420] Source: Death Notices From Richmond, Virginia Newspapers 1821-1840, The Virginia Genealogical Society, Special Publication Number 9.
  4. [S422] Source: Record written by John Henry Tabb and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86.

John Tabb

M, b. 15 September 1784, d. 26 April 1860
FatherPhilip Tabb b. 6 Nov 1750, d. 25 Feb 1822
MotherMary Mason Wythe b. 7 Sep 1751, d. 22 Sep 1814
Last Edited1 Jul 1999
     John Tabb and his brother Philip Edward made considerable fortunes, trading as flour merchants from Norfolk, Virginia, especially during the War of 1812, when they were very successful. After the war, he settled in Gloucester County, and resided at "White Marsh" on the North River. John was born on 15 September 1784.1,2 He married Evalina Matilda Prosser at Norfolk Borough, Virginia, on 18 December 1817.3 John died on 26 April 1860 at age 75.1

Family

Evalina Matilda Prosser b. 5 Aug 1799, d. 6 Sep 1862
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  2. [S538] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 109 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).
  3. [S504] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 56 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Evalina Matilda Prosser

F, b. 5 August 1799, d. 6 September 1862
Last Edited27 Jul 1999
     Evalina Matilda Prosser became the wife of John Tabb of Toddsbury. John bought out the interest of his sister-in-law in White Marsh, and he and Matilda made it their home. At that time, after adding his wife's fortune to his own, John Tabb was said to have been the wealthiest man in Gloucester. There were then three thousand acres of land in the White Marsh Plantation, and from three hundred to five hundred slaves were employed to operate it (1500 slaves rest in the slave graveyard, near the peach orchard.)

Mrs. Tabb did not wish to continue living in the country, but insisted upon moving to Norfolk or Williamsburg, in order to enjoy a gayer social life. Mr. Tabb promised that if she would make herself content, and remain in the country, he would lay out for her the finest garden in Virginia.

It was then that the terraced gardens were built, and many rare and fine species of trees were planted in the park. It was also about this time that the house was remodeled, and the wings and pillared portico built.

There are various legends, or ghost stories told of White Marsh. It is said that Evalina Matilda Tabb has been seen ascending the stairs in rustling silks. She goes immediately to the nursery and opens the drawers of the chests where the children's clothes were kept. She folds the tiny garments and replaces them. The tombstones in the family burying ground on the knoll back of the apple orchard, and overlooking the lower fields, attest that Evalina Matilda lost two of her children in infancy.

Another story is that subsequent owners of the house on returning home late at night have found all lights on and have heard music, as of a dance or party coming from the house. As they alighted from carriages or cars, the lights went out, the music ceased, and the house again stood dark and silent.


Source: Old Virginia Houses, The Mobjack Bay Country, by Emmie Ferguson Farrar, Published by Bonanza Books, New York, 1957, pages 37-41.


What follows is the will of Evelina Matilda Tabb.

In the name of God amen.

I Evelina M. Tabb of Gloucester County in Virginia widow of John Tabb late of White Marsh in said County do surly make and declare this as my last will and testament. I give to my sisters Mrs. Dabney and Mrs. Lee one thousand dollars each and to my nieces Matilda T. Holcombe and Julia E. Lee five hundred dollars each. I give unto my son Philip the balance of my estate and property of what kind sooner of which I may die poped, appoint him my Executor requesting no security be required of him by the Court. In witness whereof I hereto set my hand this sixth day of May eighteen hundred and sixty two.

Signed and published as and for her          Evelina M. Tabb last will and testament in presence of us who at the request of the Testatrix and in her presence subscribe our names as witnesses hereto.

C. C. Curtis
M. B. Seawell
A. W. Robins.

In a Court held for Gloucester County at the Courthouse on Monday the 6th day of October 1862 this paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Evelina M. Tabb deceased was proved by the oath of A. W. Robins and M. B. Seawell to of the witnesses thereto subscribed and by the Court ordered to be recorded.

Teste John R. Cary Glouc
A Copy Teste John S. Cooke sle

In the event of my son Philip not being permitted to receive and hold the property in fee simple bequeathed to him by me, I leave it to my friend Mr. C. C. Curtis.

May 6/62                    Evelina M. Tabb

C. C. Curtis, Esq.

This paper not to be opened till after my death and then only in the event of my will not being permitted to stand.

Evelina M. Tabb

At a Court held for Gloucester County at the Courthouse on the 6th day of October 1862 this paper writing and an endorsement on an envelope in which the same was enclosed were produced in Court purporting and there being no subscribing witnesses to the same, John P. Tabb and A. W. Robins were _______ and _______ disposed that they are well acquainted with the hand writing of the testatrix and verily believe that the said papers are wholly in the proper hand writing of the said testatrix, whereupon the said papers are ordered to be recorded as part and parcel of the said will.

Teste John R. Cary, Glouc
A Copy Teste John S. Cooke sle. Evalina was born on 5 August 1799. She married John Tabb at Norfolk Borough, Virginia, on 18 December 1817.1 Evalina died on 6 September 1862 at age 63.

Family

John Tabb b. 15 Sep 1784, d. 26 Apr 1860
Children

Citations

  1. [S504] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 56 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Elizabeth C. Forman

F, b. 1798, d. 1 July 1851
FatherWilliam Lee Forman
MotherJane (---?---)
Last Edited8 Jun 2016
Elizabeth C. Foreman
     She married Thomas Todd Tabb. Elizabeth was born at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, in 1798. Elizabeth died on 1 July 1851 at Gloucester County, Virginia.1 Her body was interred after 1 July 1851 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Thomas Todd Tabb b. 4 Dec 1782, d. 20 Jun 1835
Children

Citations

  1. [S496] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 41 of 107 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/021/K0273).

Philip Edward Tabb

M, b. 17 October 1786, d. 30 September 1851
FatherPhilip Tabb b. 6 Nov 1750, d. 25 Feb 1822
MotherMary Mason Wythe b. 7 Sep 1751, d. 22 Sep 1814
Last Edited1 Jan 2012
Philip E. Tabb
     Philip Edward Tabb and his brother John made considerable fortunes, trading as flour merchants from Norfolk, Virginia, especially during the War of 1812, when they were very successful. After the war, he settled in Gloucester County, and resided at "Waverly", on the North River.

Philip Edward Tabb, Sea Captain,
And the War of 1812

Philip Edward Tabb was born on October 19, 1786. He was a direct descendant of Humphrey Tabb who had patented 50 acres in Elizabeth County, Virginia, in 1637. Through his grandmother he was a descendant of the Todds of "Toddsbury" in Gloucester. Although he had several other brothers and sisters, he was very close to his older brother, John, who gave him something of a home base while he was away at sea. Philip seems to have been well educated. By the time he was 25 years old he was already the captain of the ship Portia. He diligently made copies of his letters while abroad and they cast an interesting light on the practical problems of carrying out "business as usual" during the War of 1812. His copies of some 44 letters and memos are still in existence. They were written on good quality paper bearing watermarks of 1806 and for the most part are quite legible.

In transcribing the letters one of the first problems encountered was that of spelling and punctuation. Thus we find "anctious" and "hollyday". The Spanish city of Cadiz he alternately spelled as "Cadis", sometimes in the same letter. He referred to Gloucester as "Gloster" showing that phonetic spelling was around in those days too. His sentence structure was unusual. Frequently he strung together several sentences, separated on occasion by commas or dashes. For easier reading we have sometimes had to insert periods and start new sentences.

He used capital letters constantly, often in unlikely places. The transcriptions, except as noted above, and with occasional parenthetical additions to supply obviously missing words, are just as he wrote his letters. It is surprising how few words were misspelled, and how excellent was his grammar.

We first find Philip in Lisbon on November 30, 1811, writing to his brother John and complaining about not having "heared one word from you." The war had not yet started, but back home the British had stirred up a hugh Indian uprising under Tecumseh and earlier in November there had been a major defeat of Tecumseh by General Harrison at Tippecanoe. There also had been a direct attack by the British "Little Belt" against the American frigate "President" which almost precipitated the war. James Madison, who was then President, showed more militant majority took control of Congress. Philip writes about none of these. He did not seem at all apprehensive about his position. On the 9th he writes to his investors, Armistead & Kelly, telling them that no ships had arrived for five weeks from any port south of Boston. In this letter he casually remarks that the opposing armies (French under Napoleon and the allied array headed by the British), are doing nothing. He does say that "to the south there has been some fighting and the French have gained some advantage."

By the 15th of January, 1812, he again wrote Armistead & Kelly and notes "it appears to be the prevailing opinion that all differences with England & America will be accomodated". He is also talking about shipping dollars and added a postscript to his letter saying he would order insurance from England on the money. He must have felt very comfortable about the situation to order the insurance on dollars from England. On the same day he wrote to his brother, and suggested that a way to make money would be to buy whiskey cheaply in the U.S. and because it was a "prohibited article" take it to Ireland to procure a bill of health, which would than enable it to be sold in Lisbon at a big profit.

Apparently most of the cargo of his ship, The Porcia, had been sold and during the rest of January and on into February he was busy sending the proceeds to financial houses in England for the account of his investors in the United States. These transactions involved British government bills expressed in pounds sterling. Although at home the Congress and most of the country, outside of New England, was clamoring for war, it seems to have been business as usual for Captain Tabb in Lisbon. He left Lisbon about February 8th, but not before making arrangements with his good friend Captain Hagarty to look after his affairs in Lisbon and Cadiz. He mentions other ships which might come in "to my address" and asks Captain Hagarty to act as his agent in selling their cargoes. Apparently Captain Tabb had trading interests somewhat beyond the cargo of his own ship.

It would take a month or more to cross the Atlatic and Captain Tabb next writes from Norfolk on March 31. This was a routine letter to the British firm of John and James Dunlop, clearing up some loose ends about his previous remittance.

War was declared against Great Britian on June 18, 1812. This probably explains the fact that Captain Tabb wrote no more letters and seems not to have been aboard a ship at all during the summer and early fall of 1812. The United States was poorly prepared for war and things did not go very well. A ridiculous attempt to invade Canada was commenced, and was completely unsuccessful. All in all it must have been a worrisome time for anybody in the shipping business, with the greatest Naval power in the world lurking out there in the Atlantic. Be that as it may, he did go back to sea late in the year.

There was just one letter from March 31 until Captain Tabb returned to Lisbon in December. That is a fascinating letter to his Aunt, dated August 27, 1812. It must be remembered that he was still only 26 years old. He had been ashore, presumable without having a lot to do, for some months. He managed to get into extremely hot water with the family by having made a remark about two of his cousins which was reported as being "I would sooner marry a common prostitute than one of those girls". In this lengthy letter he attempted to extricate himself from his rather delicate position. The letter was probably addressed to the girls' mother, Elizabeth Tabb Patterson, but it may possibly have been addressed to his great aunt, Martha Tabb Smith. Apparently the family row continued unabated because he was still trying to patch things up two years later on August 17, 1814, when he addressed the girls'father, John Patterson, with an abject appology for some other episode involving "the impetuosity of a youthful and hasty temper".

In December, 1812, after what he called "a boisterous passage of 27 days" Captain Tabb is back in Lisbon as master of the ship Imogene, with a cargo of flour. He didn't mention any problem with the Brithish enroute but he certainly complained about the weather and the fact that his ship was leaking so badly as to need one pump going nearly all the time. Late in December he reports that there was a tremendous storm on the coast of Lisbon, which drove some 40 ships ashore in the bay, cause the loss of at least two more outside the bay, including the British Packet apparently on its regular run to England.

The relationship with the English continued just as though there were no war. He writes the English bankers frequently, sending them thousands of pounds sterling for the account of his American backers, and using English government bills for the purpose. On December 28 he wrote to one of the cargo owners describing the sad state of the market for flour, the work needed to be done on his ship, and in passing states that "The two contending armies appear to be quite inactive at present, having I believed stacked their arms and sheathed their swords until the commencement of another campaign". He also reported that the allied army was on the frontier of Portugal and the French not far distant on the river south side of the Tagus River. There is no hint that he is much worried about the war. It is almost as though it had nothing to do with him. On January 5, 1813, he wrote again from Lisbon: "Lord Wellington is expected to be here in a day or two- the inhabitants & English are in transports of joy, at the success of the Russians, they are a little soured tho' to hear that Bonaparte has arrived in Paris."

On the 6th of January Captain Tabb sent more remittances to England, and thinking he would be in Lisbon for quite a long stay, asked his English connection to send him "a good gold watch with a second hand, that will cost from 30 to 40 Guineas, and a light double barrel fowling piece at about 15 Guineas." He wanted these things sent to his agents ashore at Lisbon "If they can be sent by any safe conveyance". Between war and weather it would seem quite a challenge for his English friends to find a "safe conveyance". Later on he asked them to send another watch for a friend of his.

Writing again to a backer on January 10th he notes that the ship Henry was "captured and carried into Gibralter. She was cleared and proceeding on her voyage to Cadis, but unfortunately was cast away in the bay of Algesceraz". Since that bay is right next to Gibralter, the Henry didn't get very far. The wonder is that such an American ship would be released in the first place.

Captain Tabb continued to make plans, first to store his unsold cargo, then take on a ballast cargo of salt at St. Ubis (a bay just south of Lisbon) and eventually take his ship back across the Atlantic. He kept hoping that the U.S. Congress would restrict the licensing of commercial cargoes, expecting that would push up the price of flour, but nothing like that happened. On the 14th he noted that Lord Wellington had arrived in Lisbon, and was greeted with honors and parades. "For my part I would have been much better pleased had he brought his army with him, and given them a double allowance of bread".

In spite of all his dealings with the British, a letter to his backers on January 24th shows how he really felt about the war.

"Our glorious victories on the Element where John Bull thought we dare not show our faces after the declaration of war, has so enraged him that he will certainly carry on this war with much more vigor than he has hitheto done. The above mentioned order in council (blockading the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays) renders it doubtful if I shall be able to return to Virginia with this ship. I contemplate clearing out from here for New York, go on to the coast well to the south and as I pass by Cape Henry if there should be no British cruiser run in, but if I should be warned off, shall proceed to New York."

The glorious victories he referred to no doubt included the Constitution over the Guerriere near Newfoundland, the Wasp over Frolic off the coast of North Carolina, the capture of the Macedonian by the United States and Java by the Constitution. All these victories occurred in the last few months of 1812.

By early February of 1813 Captain Tabb made arrangements to sail to New York, having taken on some 10,000 bushels of salt, at a cost of $1400, as ballast. He wrote lengthy instructions to a fellow captain, his friend, James Hagarty, who seems to have volunteered to help out. This involved a complicated accounting not only for the cargo of the Imogene, but some leftover cargo from the Richmond which had apparently had been entrusted to him, and also the matter of his gold watch and fowling piece which had not yet arrived. With the uncertainties of the war, and of the market, it was rather accommodating of Mr. Hagarty to accept such responsibilities. A letter, dated February 25, asks Mr. Hagarty to dispose of the flour "as you may conceive best suited to the interests of the owners". He also notes "I have for some time expected an arrival of corn etc from will also take charge of it and do with it as may think best." There had to be a lot of mutual respect and trust to conduct business in that fashion. Nowhere did there seem to be an arrangement for paying Mr. Hagarty for his trouble.

There are no further letters until November of 1813. Probably this was because the British blockade put a temporary end to his sailing from Virginia. He addressed a letter on November 4, 1813, to his friend and backer, Mr. Robert Gamble. In that he proposed a plan to buy small vessels and use them to transport cargo "through a channel that runs close around Cape Charles and by going inside the Smiths Island and into Hog Island inlet they will scarely be exposed to the Sea at all". This letter seems not to have been completed, and presumably the idea was abandoned.

It is likely that Captain Tabb stayed off the sea for the whole of 1814. The only letter located was once dated August 17, 1814, and addressed to John Patterson, probably his cousin's father. In this he tried to clear up what must have continued to be a major family problem. In it he says "I feel no hesitation in saying that my conduct was highly improper and extremely wrong, and may be justly ascribed to the impetuosity of a youthful and hasty temper". His business letters, discussing what must have been all kinds of frustrations, making decisions directly affecting his ship and cargo, as well as other people's money all show a maturity well beyond what one might expect from a man not yet 30 years old. With business he was all business, but his personal life seems not to have been quite so smooth. It is interesting to note that while Captain Tabb was writing his letter of apology to John Patterson, only 100 miles or so away the British had landed and were proceeding to Washington D.C. where on August 24th they burned the Capitol and most of the government buildings. One would think that Captain Tabb had much more on his mind at that time than trying to patch up his differences with Mr. Patterson, which had been going on for years.

The War of 1812 officially ended on December 24, 1814, although the lack of communication meant that Andrew Jackson's great land victory at New Orleans and some further Naval successes occurred early in 1815. Captain Tabb seems to have stayed of the sea during 1815, at least there are no letters available to show otherwise. Early in 1816 and continuing through 1817 and half of 1818, he returned to the Mediterranean and was very active with the cargoes both of his own ship and for others. Although his letters show a constant battle to make a profit, in some way he finally became very affluent and retired from the sea, presumably by the end of 1818. He acquired some 480 acres on the North River in Gloucester County. That may have been a gift since it was apparently once a part of the great Toddsbury Plantation which was then owned by other parts of his family. He erected a large brick house on the property, named in "Waverly", and settled down to the life of a plantation owner.

On January 15, 1824 when he was 37 years old, he married a dark-eyed beauty of 19, Emmeline Madison Allmand. Some time later on the well-known portrait artist James Hubard, painted their portraits, which are still in existence. They had three children, two daughters and a son, Philip Jr. Emmeline died in 1838. Captain Tabb did not marry again, and died in 1851. His son survived him by just a few years, but the two girls lived on for many more years, one of them died in 1891 and the other in 1911. The Tabb estate, Waverly, was sold by the Tabb heirs after the death of Philip Jr. in 1859. The house was eventually destroyed by fire in 1921.

Certain letters of Philip Edward Tabb 1811 - 1814

Letter No. 1
Lisbon, the 30th of November, 1811
     
My dear Brother

          Again I write you without having heared one word from you, but anctiously expect arrival every day, and hope to get some tidings by the first that comes. There has not been an arrival from anywhere in the United States south of Boston for three weeks. I can't conceive what has been the cause of it. Although there has been so far few arrivals, it produced __ little change in the market, for the merchants are under an impression that immence quantities of flour will arrive from America as soon as the winds get to the West (?). It has been to the East'd for a fortnight. Should they be disappointed in their expectations in this respect, flour will be in demand, and I now think it will be a very good article at any rate this winter, for the crops in England are very short and flour in demand, that none will come from there here. The Greeks will bring none for there is a sacarcity in the Mediterranean. Flour is now about $15, corn 225 cts to 235 cts per bushel, barley about $223 cts wheat 3 1/4$ to 3 1/2 rice $7 1/2 per 132#. The regency will on application permit the exportation permit of Spanish dollars, but I wish to know the state of exchange(?).

Letter No. 2
     
Lisbon 9th of Decr 1811
Messrs Armistead & Kelly

Gentlemen
     
I fear you may attach some blame (?) to me for suffering your funds to be dormant in Lisbon but I have acted with yours, as well as with my brothers and my own. I have not remited bills because I am entirely ignorant of the state of exchanges not having rec'd any information from any port south of Boston since the arrival of Captain J___ which has been five weeks since, until the day before yesterday we had several arrivals from New York and Philadelphia, all very long passages. They state exchanges at those places ____ below par. I have been anctiously expecting to hear from you or my brother, for the last month, but am as yet without any information from either of you. Corn continues to rise, it is now from 225 cts to 260 per bul (bushel), barley about $225 and wheat $3 1/4 to 3 1/2 p.bul. Rice is in demand at $8 1/2 to 9 per 132#. Peas and beans will do very well. Nothing has occurred between the ___ armies of note. To the south there has been fighting and the French have gained some advantage.

Remember me with respect to Mrs. A. & family

Philip Edw Tabb

Letter No. 3

Lisbon the 15th of Jany 1812
Messrs Armistead & Kelly

Gentlemen

By the Sheffield I informed you of the disappointment I have met with in my expectation of shipping sugar on board the Sheffield. Capt. Cowper having promised and agree with me for freight at two and half dollars p. box and when they were ready to go on board he refused to take them on board, saying they would make in too deep. I could now ship them on board the Sylf but it appears to be the prevailing opinion that all differences with England & America will be accommodated, and if so, these being inferior sugars I should be afraid of their turning out to be a bad account, and I expect certainly to obtain a permit in two or three days for shipping dollars, and will send them on the brig Hope Capt Boush of Norfolk, who sails in five or six days.
I am Gentlemen with ___
      Yours
      Philip Edw Tabb
P.S. I shall order insurance __ England on the money.

Letter No. 4
     
Lisbon 15th Jany 1812

My dear Brother

Having written to you a few days since I have only to say that I have not heard from you since the arrival of the Mary Barrot although you promised to write from the North whither you were then going. I shall obtain a permit in two or three days to ship dollars and my business here will then be completed, but I wish to hear from you before I determine on anything further. Mr. Hagarty went on the Mary Barrot to Cadis or Gibralter and I have his business to attend. I think it probable I shall leave this in a fortnight unless some information from you should detain me. I have an idea that money may be made in this trade., and although we have been hitherto unfortunate I think may yet do well. Whiskey is near two dollars p. Gal (?) here and with us I suppose it may be had at 60 or 70 cts, then the only difficulty is to get it into this country it being a prohibited article. All that is necessary is to go to Ireland and procure a bill of health, in which there is no difficulty, and it is the only document that is wanting to admit it to our entry here. You shall hear more particularly from me on this subject in a few days, for I am of an opinion that a fortune may be made, if carried on largely and executed immediately. The invoice cost of whiskey in Ireland is not 6/Stg Per __, and will certainly be higher from the sarcity of grain in England.

      Remember me to all Enquiring friends
      I am dear Brother yours truly

      Philip Edw Tabb

Lisbon

the 17th of Jany 1812
Messrs Robert & Temple Gwathmuy

Gentlemen

By last mail I enclosed you the first bill of a set for one thousand pounds Sterg for Mr. Hagerty to be placed to the credit of Robert Gamble Esq. of Richmond. You find here enclosed the Second Bill, the third I shall keep, being Government Bills three composes a set.

You will oblige me by sending an acknowledgement of the receipt of, and difrect your letter if you please to the care of Messrs Morrogh &Walsh Lisbon
     
I am Gentlemen respectfully yours

      Philip Edw Tabb


Lisbon

the 21st of Jany 1812
Mr. Robert Gamble

Sir
     
Mr. Hagerty left this a fortnight since for Cadis or Gibralter and requested me to attend to his concerns in this place. According to his request I have remited by the last two mails the first and second of a set of Brit'h Government Bills for one thousand pounds Sterg to Messrs Robert & Temple Gwathmuy of Liverpool, for your account. Payable at thirty days sight. By the next mail I will remit to Messrs Gwathmuy the Ballance due from the proceeds of the five hundred Barrels deposited here by Capt Beard.

I am Dear Sir with much respect
     
      yours most obedly
      Philip Edw Tabb

Flour $15 p. Bal.
Corn $2.10 p. Bal.
Ship bread 8 p. bal.
Rich 8;, 132lb.
Barley 2 p. Bal


Lisbon 28th of Jany 1812
Mr. Robert Gamble

Dear Sir

I have heard nothing from Mr. Hagarty since his departure for Cadis, and his business in this place remains nearly as when he left it. No further sales have been made of the flour. I yesterday requested Messrs Glould Brothers & Co whose hands it (is) in to try it once more at Public Auction, which in my opinion it ought to be sold for what it will bring, for the longer it is kept on hand the worse it will be. I here enclose you the acct sales of the flour left by Capt Beard in the hands of Messrs Morrogh and Walsh, and will remit by this mail the Balance due, to Messrs Roberet & Temple Gwathmuy of Liverpool to whom I remitted L 1000 Sterling a fortnight since, for your account. I expect to have this in about a week and hope by that time Mr. Hagarty will return.

I am dear sir with Esteem, yours

      Philip Edw Tabb


Lisbon 28th of Jany 1812
Messrs Armistead & Kelly

Gentlemen

I here enclose you the account of sales of the Porcias cargo and a Bill of Lading of three thousand five hundred dollars specie, shipped on blard the Brig Hope Capt Joseph Seawood. I shall order insurance in London and shall remit to Messrs Dunlpes a small Sterg bill for your account. I expect this will be my last from Lisbon as I expect to embark for Philadelphia in eight or ten days.

      With high consideration
      I am truly yours
      Philip Edw Tabb


Sylph Capt
Doget of Richmond

Lisbon 3rd of Feby 1812
Mr. Robert Gamble

Dear Sir

I here enclose you a duplicate of the account sale of flour left in the hands of Morrogh & Walsh by Capt Beard. I shall remit the Balance due you by the first mail to Messrs Gwathmuy of Liverpool. Should have done it some time since but no Packet has sailed for England for more than two weeks.

I have sold a day or two since 1000 Barls of the flour left my Mr. Hagerty at Public Auction. It sold for from $14.87 1/2 to %15. About 900 Barls remains and I shall endeavor to get that off tomorrow or the next day. Good new flour will command in this market $15.50 Corn $2 to @ .20 but rye meal is the best article at present $13.50. Rice $9 to 9.50. These are prices on Board clear of duty.

      I am with much respect your friend
      Philip Edw Tabb


Lisbon the 6th Feby 1812

My Dear Brother

Having made up my mind to take passage on board the Hope of Norfolk I think proper to enclose you a copy of my Acct. current with Messrs Armistead & Kelly not wishing you to show it to them but hold it merely in case of any accident attending on my passage because I have charged them in the Acct curt with L450 Stg remited Messrs Dunlops. I have remitted the L450 byt with days since and although I have a permit for shipping dollars and had a bill of lading signed for $35000 I had them exchange for Bills having had intelligence of Bills being at 15 pt in the United States. I therefore inclose you the first sets of three Bills for L1000 Stg and shall remit Messrs Dunlop a small bal on your Acct. I expect to see you befor this comes to hand as I am embarking for Norfolk.
     
I am yours truly
     
Philip Edw Tabb

1st British gov Bills
one for l500 Stg No. 2807
one for L250 do do 2859
one for L2590 do do 2860


Lisbon
6th of Feby 1812
Mr. James Hagarty

My Dear Friend

I recd yours of the 11th ult on a day or two since. I think it would be useless for me to write you at Gibralter for you must be ready to leave there. I directed a letter to you at Cadis which I suppose will be forwarded. I sold 1000 Barrels of your flour on the 30th ult at auction the lowest sold for 11$900 the highest 12$___ which was better than I expected. I have not yet drawn anything more than the thousand pounds you requested for the weather has been so bad that the flour could not be delivered. I shall give Mr. Walt the Power you gave me as I believe he will do you every justice for I am pleased with the manner of our settlement. At any rate I suppose you will be absent___a little time longer or I would stop for the Robert Waln. Write to me at Norfolk and let me know how things __on. I have written frequently to Mr. Gamble and enclose two copies of the Accts sales of Captain Beards flour and I remitted the ballance due to Messrs Gwathmuys to Liverpool.

      I am ___Hagrety your friend
      Philip Edw Tabb


Lisbon
6th of Feby 1812
Messrs Morrogh & Walsh

Gentlemen

As I am about to leave Lisbon for the United States and think it probable one or more vessels may arrive a short time after my departure to my address this will authorize you to act as my agent as respects the sales of such cargoes, paying due attention to instructions that may be given by the shippers, making such remittances as may be advised by them, and as instructions will be instructions to credit them with a L and hold L400 until they recieve further instructions from you or myself, that in case you may have made any arrangements with them for my part of the ship, or that the may have recd the proceeds of my property in New York. In either of those cases I shall have it in my power to hold on upon the L400. But if no arrangements have taken place between you an them with respect to the payment of what I own them you will please instruct Messrs Dunlops to Credit them the L400, and show them my acct current. If I have time I will enclose you also a copy of Messrs A & K acct recd when I was in Norfolk as I was about to leave it that I had not time to examine it. I will __of time will__point errors and charges, or rather objections to charges made by me (in) which I concur. Just oh my part and not on his to the amt of between 6 & 700 dolls. It is probable I shall see you before this comes to hand with out in ___. I enclose you the first bills for three hundred Pounds Sterg.
      I
am dear brother your truly
     
Philip Edw Tabb
1st Brith govt bill
for L300 Stg No. 2751
By the Phocian of New York


Philip Edward Tabb, although only 30 years old, was an experienced sea captain in 1816 when once again he returned to Spain and Portugal. He kept handwritten copies of his letters and many of them have survived intact.

He kept copies of only those business letters he wrote while in Europe and there are no copies of the letters to which he was responding to him. He married and settled down at Waverly in Gloucester by 1824 and died in 1851. Waverly was sold after his death and burned to the ground in 1921.

The following letter begins the next series to be published in Glo-Quips. The Transcriptions and background on Capt. Tabb were provided by Robert C. Brockway.

Letter No. 11
Libon the 6th of Februy 1812

My Dear Brother

I here enclose you a second bill for three hundred pounds Stg.
      I am truly yours
      Philip Eds Tabb
      of Richmond
2d Brith Govt Bill
for L 300 Stg No. 2751


Letter No. 12
Lisbon the 6th of Feby 1812
Messrs Armistead & Kelly

Gentlemen

U here enclose you the second sets of Bills for L 1000 Stg. The first set I send direct those will go by the way of New York.

      I am truly yours
      By the Sylph of Richmond

one for L 500 No. 2807
one for L 250 No. 2859
one for L 250 No. 2860


Leter No. 13
Lisbon 6th Feby 1812
Messrs Armistead & Kelly

Gentlemen

I recd yours of the 11th December a few days since and although I have a permit for shipping dollars and had a bill of lading signed for $3500 I had them exchanged for Bills having had intelligence of Bills being at 15 pt in the United States. I therefore inclose you the first sets of three Bills for L1000 Stg and shall remit Messrs Dunlop a small bal on your Acct. I expect to see you before this comes to hand as I am
embarking for Norfolk.
     
      I am yours truly
1st Brith govt Bills
one for L500 Stg No. 2807
one for L250 do do 2859
one for L250 do do 2860


Letter No. 16
Lisbon 6th of Feby 1812
Messrs J & J Dunlop

Gentlemen

Being about to leave Lisbon for the United States I have enclosed you a small ballance of four hundred and fifty pounds Stg fifty pounds Stg fifty pounds of which you will please place to the credit of Messrs Armistead & Kelly and the four hundred remain in you hands uncharged untill you hear from me or my brother giving instructions in what manner it shall be appropriated . The second set will be forwarded by the next mail.

      I am Gentlemen with regard your
      Philip Edw Tabb
1st set Brith Govt Bills
one for L 300 Stg No. 2752
one for L 150 Stg No. 2753


Letter No. 17
Lisbon the 8th Feby 1812
Messrs R & T Gwathmuy

Gentlemen

I have enclosed you the first of a set of bills of L395...165...4 Sterling dated this day and payable thirth days sight which you will please place to the credit of Mr. Robert Gamble of Richmond

I am about leaving Lisbon and am with sincer friendship
      yours
      Philip E. Tabb

2nd Enclosed in Duplicate of this date_____

Letter No. 18

Norfolk 31st March 1812
Messrs John and James Dunlop

Gentlemen

I enclosed you the day before my departure from Lisbon Govt bills to the amt of L450, requesting L50 to the credit of Messrs Armistead & Kelly, the ballance to laid over for further orders. You will be pleased now to place that sum to my credit, or John Tabb.

      I am with high consideration
      your obdt svt
      Philip E. Tabb


Letter No. 19

Augt 27th 1812
Dear Aunt (probably Elizabeth Tabb Patterson)

It cannot be otherwise that hurtful to my feelings that any word or act of mine should have been so construed as to have produced a cold indifference on the part of you and your daughters, who are so nearly and dearly connected to me. I have observed this conduct for some time past and have information also of the alleged cause. I will not proceed to facts, and shall lay them before you in the most candid manner. I am accused, it appears by Mr. Patterson of having spoken fallaciously and disrepectfully of him and his daughters. I deny the charge as respects his daughters, and that I ever said what was false of him I deny also. The particulars as far as I can learn will amount to the following. viz.

That I introduced the subject to Capts Johnson & Blake, respecting Mr. Patterson and daughters, by observing, that I would sooner marry a common prostitute than one of those girls, that I represented Mr. Patterson as a tyrant, and capable of acting any other part than that of a gentleman. I will not contrast the words utter'd by me as nearly as I can recollect them and you will be enabled to perceive their different tendencies. The question was officiously put to me by one or the other of those men why I did not get married, that there were the Miss Pattersons in Mathews, fine girls, and of large fortunes. A girl passing at the time, I observed that I would as soon espouse that woman as one of them. Capt. Johnson observed that he wondered at my speaking so lightly of my ousins I answered that it was by no means intended to reflect on the girls, they were too nearly related to me, and nothing would induce me to place my domestic happiness on so tottering a foundation as conceivably it would be, subject to the whims and overbearing disposition of Mr. Patterson, that I must at any rate observe milder conduct towards his amiable wife before I could anywise be inclined to become one of the family, and I have my dear Aunt but too good grounds for making this observation. This conversation as well as I recollect took place between two and three years since and I did not recollect at the time the servants of particular ______on this subject before but I have been expecting that Mr. Patterson would have demanded an explanation, as I should have done of any man whom I had understood had made an improper use of my name. It would have appeared unnatural in me my dear Aunt to have spoken in any manner disrespectful of those who are so nearly related to me, and I should as soon have thought of criticizing(?) the conduct of my own sisters as that of my cousins, and I should have looked on myself with contempt had (I? been guilty of such an act. I hope this will be sufficient to convince you that I meant no disparagment to my cousins and I shall anctiously wish and expect to hear from you to that effect. I would say much more but Armistead Smith is about to write, and he will convey this to you.

      I am dear Aunt your Affect. Neph
      Philip Edw Tabb

     

All the articles on Philip Edward Tabb were in one of our local county
papers called "Glo-Quips". The issues of this paper comes out every 2 weeks in Mathews/Gloucester Counties.

Bonnie T. Smith

This final article is taken from the Mathews-Gloucester Gazette Journal, which is published every week. The date isn't on the paper, but take in to consideration that our paper is printed every Thursday, the date would be August 12, 1999. While to first sailor doesn't pertain to your TABB Family, the second does, thru his wife.
     
READER SPECIAL

Friends, Family And Former Slaveholders

A Peep At The Pension Files of Two Civil War Sailors
by Constance V. Brooks
(c) 1999.

Information in brackets inserted by writer. Punctuation not corrected.

Substantiating birth dates and marriages probed particularly challenging for former slaves seeking a Civil War Pension or pension increase; however, the balidation process created a rich genealogical source, one offering varried views of 19th century society. Nearly every file this researcher has read includes testimony from or about family, friends, and neighbors, which could include the very owner(s) from whom a slave escaped befor enlisting in the Union forces. To estimate dates, a veteran or his witnesses may recall special events before, during, or after the Civil War.

Henry Whiting,
Gloucester Sailor

On August 19, 1861, Henry Whiting enlisted in the U.S. Navy for two years and served on the USS Delware, a gunboat. "I went aboard of her at Hampton Roads[,]Va. I was discharged up James River where the fleet lay," Whiting states in his pension file.

At Baltimore, Whiting joined the Army in 1866, the year after Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox. Whiting went south. When the Army discharged the three-year soldier, he made New Orleans his home. Using an event to establish his age, here's what Henry Whiting has to say in an affidavit dated June 16, 1906, more than four decades after the Civil War ended: I cannot furnish evidence as to age. I was born in Gloster County., Va. Across York River, not far distant from Fortress Monroe. I was a boy at least ten(10) years old when troops returned (in 1848) from the Mexican War. Remember distinctly where a cannon (that troop brought back to Gloster, Va) was stored by them at Gloster Co., (Va.) Court House. Remember distinctly the return of Mr. Carey and Doctor Klopton [Clopton?], Mr Carey died before the civil war and I nursed him - and assisted in burying him. My old owners are dead they had no children. I cannot declare what age was given by [the Navy] enrolling officer, but I am certain I am fully sixty eight (68) years old." [The quarterly muster rolls of the USS Delaware note the following about Henry Whitning: date of enlistment, August 19, 1862; age, 19; occupation, waiter...]

Henry Whiting, giving at least two varying birth dates along the way, did eventually get a Civil War pension.

Isaac Washington,
called
Prophet Washington,
Mathews Sailor

Late one August night in 1861, "in a small open boat," Prophet Washington and four other Mathews fugitives pulled alongside the elegant U.S. Flagship Minnesota at Hampton Roads and demanded "food and protection." Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham wrote to Gideon Wells, Secretary of the U.S. Navy, and this group became part of the Navy's official correspondence. (See Names on Record: A Journal Featuring Virginians of African Descent.)

Isaac Washington,enlisting on the Minnesota, eventually transferred to the Young America. In early March 1862, the Young America, a tug, assisted Union ships during and after the bloody battles culminating in a historic confrontation: the all-iron USS Monitor against the ironcladd CSS Virginia (the former USS Merrimack).

Isaac Washington received a pension for his Civil War service. When he died in New York, Nancy Washington, his widow, applied for a pension.


Nancy Washington, born Thornton,
January 12, 1901

I am about 66 years of age. My ocupation is house keeper, and I reside at 20 Jones St, New York City I am the widow of Isaac Washington, who enlisted in the U.S. Navy during the civil war he enlisted at Old Point Comfort Va. in Aug 1861 and he was about three years in the navy, and then discharged about Aug 1864. The next month after that he enlisted as a "Cook" in a Boat I think by the name of "Mosswood" and remained there about a year, and then he was discharged. That was the only service (?) he was in military or naval. [From Spet. 1, 1864, until August 22, 1865, Isaac Washington was a civilian cook on the army gunboat Mooswood.]

Nancy Washington's deposition continues

Q. Can you remember the different vessels your husband was on between Aug 1861 and Aug 1864?

A. I recollect that he said he was on the "America," [Young America] and the "Minnesota" I don't know whether he was on any other "Boat". My husband Isaac Washington during his life-time was pensioned at the rate of $12.00 per month, and he died March 1, 1900....

I was born in Gloucester Co,Va in 1835. At a town called Waverly Place. At that time I was a slave. The name of my master was Edward Tabb. I was a slave of Edward Tabb at the time I married the soldier [sailor] when I was just 15 years of age. My husband was a slave also at that time and he was a slave of Henry Tabb. A brother of my Master. My husband then in lived [lived in] Mathews Co,Va, and we lived in Glouster [Gloucester] Co.,Va. There was a Creek between the two Counties, they used to called[call] it the North River...My husband, Isaac Washington, got the consent from my owner to marry me, and then he told his owner that he had got the consent from my owner to marry me, and then he got a note from his owner to my ownner that he consented, and then we were married. Henry Tabb, and Edward Tabb are dead, and so is the minister who performed the ceremony. The ceremony of marriage took place in the parlor of the house of my Master, Edward Tabb.

Q. Who were present at the marriage ceremony?

A. I recollect that Emeline Tabb, now the wife of Dr. Welford, I cant think of his first name, who now lives in Richmond,Va. Don't know what street she lives on, was present at the marriage. She was the daughter of my master. My Master had two daughters, and one boy. They are all dead except Emeline(?). [On February 28, 1901, Emeline M. Wellford, wife of John S. Wellford, was living at 313 East Grace Street.] I can also refer you to Spriggs Lee [Sprig Lee?] of Hampton Va. He belonged to my husband's Master, and he will know all about it. No Sir I dont think he was present at the marriage. I can also refer you to Willie Lee. He can give you information. He also lives in Hampton Va. I cannot recall to mind any of the children of Henry Tabb the Master of my husband except Arthur Tabb, and I believe you can find him at Hampton Va. Oh Yes Sir there is a man by the name of Ferdinand Lee, a brother of Spriggs [Sprig] and Willie Lee, who can give you information as to my marriage, and cohabitation. This Ferdinand Lee now works in the Pension Office, Washington D.C. There is also Harry Tabb the son on my husband's master. I don't know where he is now, but I think Arthur Tabb can tell you.
[Henry Tabb had owned Isaac Washington, Nancy Washington's husband, and Philip Lee, Sprig Lee's father, who served on the Charles Phelps. The Charles Phelps supplied coal to Union vessels.]

Mrs. Washington continues.

After we were married I staid with my Master, and my husband remained with his Master till my Master died in Sept 1851, then we broke up, and I went to Richmond Va with Mary the daughter of my Master, and my husband remained with his Master. I remained with Mary till the war was over. While I was with Mary at Richmond Va. My husband came there, and saw me. He would not be any kind of husband if he hadn't. I lived with Mary Tabbs [Tabb] from 1851 to about 1866. I cant say how often my husband called upon me during that time [unclear] he [unclear] he[unclear] came on holidays or any other time his Master would let him come.

Q. Do you recollect the time he went in the Navy?

A. No, sir, he was in the service a good while before(?) I knew it. No Sir he did not come to see me while he was in the service.

Q. Now Mrs Washington from your testimony it would appear that you left Waverly Place with Mary in 1851, and that your husband enlisted in Aug.1861. Did you see your husband during that time?

A. Oh yes. My husband came to Richmond Va to see me when ever his master would let him come. he came about once a year. Just as the Master of my husband thought proper. yes Sir all that time my husband was living with his Master in Matthews Co.,Va. While he was in the Army [Navy], I did not see him, but in about in 1865 the latter part, he came oh his boat the "Mosswood" and he staid at Richmond Va sometimes, and he was with me mostly all the time. He was working but he would come to see me nights. After the Yankees took Richmond Va I left Mary. I was privileged to go where I pleased, and when my husband went back to Norfolk Va from Richmond Va I went down with him. No Sir I did not go down on his boat, neither did he, We both went down on the passenger boat, and when we reached Norfolk Va we hired a floor in one of the houses on Allentown Street, Norfolk Va. I don't know the number, and we lived there as man and wife til 1870, when I came here to New York in August 1870, and he came in Oct. 1870...[Nancy Washington lists her children: Rebecca, Wm Henry, Jasper, Isaac, David, Samuel, Mary, Frank, Fred, and a still born.] "I have four children alive. Jasper, David, Frank, Fred."

Q. What has become of Mary Tabbs [Tabb] the lady you went to Richmond Va with?

A. She is dead. He name was Mrs. Crump.

****
Nancy Washington received her pension with the help of Sprigg Lee, who had visited the couple in Norfolk and New York, and the help of others from Mathews, Gloucester, Norfolk, and New York. Emeline Wellford, daughter of Nancy Washington's owner, could "recall nothing whatever" about Nancy Washington's marriage. She did suggest that Henry A. Tabb, the son of Isaac Washington's "master", might have some information. According to Emeline Wellford, Tabb's wife kept a "fashionable boarding house in New York City." Philip was born on 17 October 1786.1,2 He married Emmeline Madison Allmand at Norfolk Borough, Virginia, on 15 January 1824.3 Philip died on 30 September 1851 at age 64.1,2 His body was interred after 30 September 1851 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Emmeline Madison Allmand b. 1805, d. 4 Apr 1838
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Source: This is an exact copy of Patterson Smiths papers loaned by Edward Dabney Septermber 15, 1892, and housed at the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA, Mss 1M 6663c 4285-42-86, (stated as copied from the Old Toddsbury Bible).
  2. [S612] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, K., Card 75 of 144 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0464).
  3. [S501] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 51 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).

Emmeline Madison Allmand

F, b. 1805, d. 4 April 1838
Last Edited27 Jul 1999
     Emmeline was born in 1805.1 She married Philip Edward Tabb at Norfolk Borough, Virginia, on 15 January 1824.1 Emmeline died on 4 April 1838.1 Her body was interred in April 1838 at Gloucester County, Virginia, at Ware Church.

Family

Philip Edward Tabb b. 17 Oct 1786, d. 30 Sep 1851
Children

Citations

  1. [S501] Source: R. Bolling Batte Papers in posession of The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, biographical Card Files, Tabb, A, Card 51 of 136 (http://198.17.62.51/cgi-bin/drawerIII/disk8/CC/BA/035/T0463).